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NEW WOMEN'S DORMITORY 




State College at Fitchburg 



Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts 



Established 1894 



ACCREDITED BY 

New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 



MEMBER OF 

The Eastern States Association of Professional Schools for Teachers 

The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education 

Massachusetts Council on Teacher Education 

Association of Teacher Education Institutions 

The New England Teacher Preparation Association 

National Commission on Accrediting 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




Administration 


1 


Faculty 


2 


College Description 


10 


Admissions Procedure 


11 


Costs 


12 


Parking 


12 


Student Assistance 


12 


Requirements for Graduation 


13 


Requirements for Student Teaching 


13 


Other Requirements and Regulations 


14 


DEGREE PROGRAMS 


14 


Explanation of Course Numbers 


15 


Teacher Training Curricula 


16 


Elementary Education 


16 


Special Education 


17 


Secondary Education 


18 


Biology 


19 


Chemistry 


20 


English 


21 


Geography 


22 


History 


23 


Industrial Arts 


24 


Mathematics 


25 


Physics 


26 


Nursing Curriculum 


27 


Medical Technology Curriculum 


28 


Liberal Arts Curricula 


29 


Biology 


30 


English 


31 


History 


32 


Physics 


33 


DESCRIPTION OF COURSE AND REQUIREMENTS 




*Explanation of Course Description Numbers 


34 


Art 


34 


Biology 


36 


Chemistry 


38 


Education 


39 


English 


41 


Foreign Languages 


44 


French 


44 


Latin 


45 


Spanish 


46 


Geography 


46 


History 


48 


Industrial Arts 


52 



TABLE OF CONTENTS CONT. 



INDEX 



Library Science 


5ft 


Mathematics 


56 


Medical Technology 


59 


Music 


59 


Nursing 


61 


Philosophy 


62 


Physical Education 


64 


Physics 


65 


Psychology 


67 


Science 


68 


Social Sciences 


69 


Special Education 


70 


Speech 


71 


♦Explanation of Course Description Numbers 


74 


£ 


Back Page 



^ht (Kammrmfaealtlj of JiB&szztfymettz 

The Board of Trustees of State Colleges 

50 Franklin Street 

Boston, Massachusetts 




BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Dr. Kenneth R. Fox, Chairman 



Mr. Joseph F. Alibrandi 



Capt. John S. Keating 



Mr. William E. Aubuchon, Jr. Mr. Thomas D. O'Connor IJ 



Dr. Wilbur J. Bender 



Mr. Howard C. Smith 



Mrs. Marion N. Chandler 



Mrs. Margaret Spengler 



Mr. Haskell Freedman 



Mrs. Sol W. Weltman 



Dr. Francis X. Guindon 

Acting Director 

Division of State Colleges 



ADMINISTRATION 



James J. Hammond, Ed.M. 
George H. Merriam, Ph.D. 
John J. Boursy, B.S. 
Mary L. Roache, Ed.M. 
Harry Crowley, Ed.D. 

Dayton N. Dennett, Ph.D. 
Edward T. Donnelly, Ed.D. 
Adele M. Driscoll, Ed.D. 

Edward F. Driscoll, Ph.D. 

Joseph F. Durant, Ed.D. 
Thomas Battinelli, C.A.G.S. 

William H. Fitzgibbon, M.S. 

William J. Goldman, Ed.D. 

Roger F. Holmes, Ed.D. 

Lawrence W. Jackson, A.B. 
Richard L. Kent, Mus. A.D. 

John J. Mazeika, M.Ed. 
Philip A. McMurray, Ed.M. 

Alice T. O'Malley, Ph.D. 
Katherine Sehl, Ed.D. 



President 

Academic Dean 

Assistant to the President 

Dean of Women 

Chairman, Behavioral Science 
Department 

Chairman, English Department 
Chairman, Industrial Arts Department 

Coordinator of Student Teaching; 
Chairman, Education Department 

Coordinator of Instructional Media, 
Industrial Arts 

Dean of Students 

Chairman, Physical Education 
Department 

Dean of Men, 
Science 

Chairman, Special Education 
Department 

Director of Graduate Study; 

Chairman, Social Studies Department 

Director of Admissions 

Chairman, Fine Arts Department, 
Music 

Registrar 

Director of Evening College and 
Summer School 

Chairman, Biology Department 
Chairman, Nursing Department 



FACULTY - 



Donald M. Adams 



Joseph A. Angelini 



Evelyn R. Antil 



Elmer J. Arsenault 



Lillian Bannon 



Thomas Battlnelli 



Albert Berkowitz 



Howard J. Besnia 



Hasan Bey 



Colin A. Bourn 



William A. Bowers 



Grainger Browning 



Joseph E. Carpenter 



Norman Carson 



Eugene Casassa 



George M. Case 



William Casey 



Robert W. Clark 



M.B. Boston University; Ed.M. State College at Fitch- 
burg. Assistant Professor - Music 

A.B. Providence College; Ed.M. Boston College; 

C.A.G.S. Boston University. Assistant Professor - 

Mathematics 

B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.S. Boston 

University. Instructor - Nursing 

B.E. Tufts University; M.F.A. Syracuse University. 
Instructor - Art 

B.S. Nursing Ed. Boston College School of Nursing; 
M.Ed. Boston College. Assistant Professor - Nursing 

A.A., B.S. Boston University; M.Ed. Boston College; 
C.A.G.S. Boston University. Assistant Professor - 
Physical Education 

B.J. Ed. Hebrew Teachers College; B.S. Ed. Boston Uni- 
versity; M.Ed. State College at Boston. Instructor - 
Special Education 

A.B. Clark University; B.F.A., M.F.A. Yale University. 
Assistant Professor - Industrial Arts 
Diploma. Teachers State College, Elbasan, Albania; 
Diploma. Scientific State College, Shkoder, Albania; 
Ph.D. State University of Parma, Italy. Associate Pro- 
fessor - Chemistry 

A.B. St. Michael's College; M.Ed. State College at Fitch- 
burg; M.A. University of Massachusetts. Instructor - 
English 

B.S. Ed. Eastern Michigan University; M.S. Michigan 
State University. Associate Professor - Physics 
A.B. Shaw University; M.A., Ph.D. Boston University. 
Associate Professor - Sociology 

B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teacherr College; Ed.M. 
Worcester State Teachers College; C.A.G.S. University 
of Connecticut. Assistant Professor - Industrial Arts 

B.S., M.Ed. State University of New York at Brockport. 
Instructor - History 

B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.A. Colum- 
bia University Teachers College. Instructor - Speech 

B.S. College of Wooster; M.A. University of Mass- 
achusetts. Instructor - English 

B.S., M.A. Boston College; M.S. Simmons College. 
Librarian 

A.B. Brown University; M.Ed. State College at Bridge- 
water; M.A. Rutgers University. Instructor - Mathe- 
matics 



Marion B. Clark 

3rEORGE F. CONDIKE 
VflCHAEL J. CONLON 

Nicholas J. Copoulos 
Catherine Cox 
Angelo Cozzetto 

3arry L. Crowley 

-iEe N. Cunningham 
^ederic Davis 
/"eva K. Dean 

llCHARD DECESARE 

Dayton N. Dennett 

Virginia Doyle 
Edward T. Donnelly 

Theresa A. Downey 
\dele M. Driscoll 

Edward F. Driscoll 
Rita Driscoll 
Joseph F. Durant 



A.B. Ohio Wesley an; A.M. Western Reserve Uni- 
versity; A.M. Boston University. Assistant Professor - 
Physical Education 

A.B. Depauw University; Ph.D. Cornell University. 
Professor - Chemistry 

A.B. Holy Cross College; A.M. Boston College. 
Professor - Philosophy 

B.S., M.Ed. Boston University. Assistant Professor - 

Mathematics 

B.Ed. University of Minnesota; A.M. Clark University. 

Assistant Professor - Geography 

B.A. Brooklyn College; M.A. Middlebury College; Prof. 

Cert. Teachers College, Columbia University. Assistant 

Professor - Spanish 

B.S. Bates College; Ed.M., Ed.D. Boston University. 
Professor and Chairman - Behavioral Science De- 
partment 

B.S. Springfield College; M.Ed. University of Massa- 
chusetts. Instructor - Physical Education 

B.S.E.E. University of Connecticut; M.S. University 
of Massachusetts. Assistant Professor - Biology 
B.A. North Dakota State Teachers College; M.A., Ph.D. 
Clark University. Professor - Geography 
3.3. Holy Cross College; M.A. Boston College. As- 
sistant Professor - Philosophy 

-B.A. City College of New York; M.A. Columbia Uni- 
versity; Ph.D. Cornell University. Professor and 
Chairman - English Department 

B.S.N. Boston College School of Nursing; M.S. Catholic 
University of America. Instructor - Nursing. 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College; Ed.D. 
Boston University. Professor and Chairman - In- 
dustrial Arts Department 

B.S., M.S. Boston University. Instructor - Nursing. 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College; Ed.D. 
Boston University. Coordinator of Student Teaching. 
Professor and Chairman - Education Department 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College; Ph.D. 
University of Connecticut. Professor - Industrial Arts 

B.S. Clark University; M.S. Boston University. Instruc- 
tor - Nursing 

A.B., M.A., Ed.D. Boston College. Dean of Students 



Irene K. Dwyer 
Robert Ehrlich 
Harold J. Enzian 

Rose Marie A. Esposito- 
Joseph Farias 
Louis B. Fike 
William Fitzgibbon 

Katherine Flynn 

Alice M. Foley 
Norman H. Fredette 

Donald Freeburg 

Aviva Freedman 
Robert Frttz 

Everett A. Garvin 

Jane Gilligan 
William J. Goldman 

Robert W. Greene 



Evelyn Hayes 
Vincent L. Haley 

Mary Haley 
James J. Hammond 



A.B. Marietta College; M.A. University ot Illinois. In- 
structor - Speech 

A.B., M.A. Boston University; M.A. Brandeis University. 

Associate Professor - History 

B.S. Oswego State College; M.A. Kent State University; 
Ph.D. Ohio State University. Associate Professor - In- 
dustrial Arts 

B.S. Beaver College; M.S. Southern Connecticut State 
College Instructor - Biology, Medical Technology. 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College. 
Instructor - Industrial Arts 

- A.B. Franklin and Marshall College. Assistant Profes- 
sor - Political Science. 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.N.S. 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Dean of Men and 
Associate Professor - Science 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College. 
Instructor - Special Education 

B.S. Boston College. Instructor - Nursing 

- B.S. University of Massachusetts; M.Ed. Harvard Uni- 
versity. Instructor - Science. 

B.S. Pennsylvania State University; MA. Bowdoin Col- 
ege. Instructor - Mathematics 

- BA. McGill University; M.A. Columbia University. 
Instructor - English. 

B.F.A. Syracuse University; M.A., Ed.D. Columbia 
University. Associate Professor - Art 

- A.B. Antioch College; M.S. Tulane University; Ph.D. 
Washington University. Professor - Psychology. 

-B.A. Emmanual College; M.A. Boston College. Instruc- 
tor - English. 

B.S.Ed. Salem State Teachers College; Ed.M., Ed.D. 
Boston University. Professor and Chairman, Special 
Education Department 

B.S.Ed. Worcester State Teachers College; M.Ed. North- 
eastern University; Ph.D. University of Connecticut. 
Assistant Professor - Director of Placement 

■ B.S., M.Ed. Boston College. Instructor - Nursing 

- B.A. University of Dubuque; M.A. Teachers College of 
Columbia University. Instructor - Psychology 
B.S.N., M.S. Boston College. Instructor - Nursing 

B.S. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.S. Harvard 
University. President 






EeiJjig Hanson 

Walter F. Harrod 

Elizabeth M. Haskins - 
Daniel L. Healy 

Alfred P. Hobbs 

Roger F. Holmes 

Raymond G. Hoops 

Everett Israel 

Lawrence W. Jackson 
Richard L. Kent 

Bernice M. Krawiec 
Richard Kruse 
Theodore L. Lapierre - 

A. Orin Leonard 

Leon L'Heureux, Jr. 
Karl R. Lindquist 

Bernice C. Lothrop 
David R. Matteson 
John J. Mazeika 



B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.S. 
Worcester State Teachers College. Instructor - Indus- 
Fitchburg State Teachers College. Assistant Profesor, 
B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College; 
C.A.G.S. University of Connecticut. Associate Pro- 
fessor - Industrial Arts 

B.S., M.S. Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.A. 
Radcliffe College. Associate Professor - Mathematics 

A.B. Boston College; M.Mus. Curtis Institute of Music; 
M.Ed. Hyannis Teachers College. Associate Professor - 
English 

Diploma, Fitchburg State Normal School; B.S. Bradley 
Polytechnic Institute; M.A. New York University. In- 
structor - Industrial Arts 

B.S. Wesley an University; Ed.M. Boston University; 
Ed.D. Teachers College Columbia University. Professor 
and Chairman - Social Studies Department 

B.S. Bowling Green State University; M.A. Ohio State 
University; Sixth Year Certificate, New York Univer- 
sity. Assistant Professor - Industrial Arts 

B.S. New York State University at Oswego; M.A. 
University of Maryland. Instructor - Industrial Arts 

- A.B. Wittenburg University. Director of Admissions 

B.M.E. Drake University; M.M., New England Conserv- 
atory of Music; Mus.A.D. Boston University. Professor 
of Music and Chairman - Fine Arts Department 
B.S., M.S. Boston University. Instructor - Nursing 

- BA., M.Ed. Boston University. Instructor - Speech 

B.S.Ed. Plymouth Teachers College; M.Ed. University of 
New Hampshire. Assistant Professor - Physics 

B.A. Wesleyan University; B.S. School of Library Sci- 
ence Columbia University; M.A., Ed.D. Teachers 
College Columbia University. Associate Professor - 
Psychology 

-A.B. St. Mary's University; M.S. University of Rhode 
Island. Assistant Professor - Education 

B.A., M.Ed. University of Maine; M.S. Worcester 
Polytechnic Institute. Assistant Professor - Physical 
Science 

B.S. Simmons College; A.M. Columbia University 
Teachers College. Instructor - Home Economics 

B.A. Alfred University; B.D. Colgate Rochester Divinity 
School. Instructor - Psychology 

B.S. Holy Cross College; M.Ed. Boston College. 
Registrar 



Muriel G. McAvoy 
Joanne McCarthy 
John McGrail, Jr. 
Philip A. McMurray 

George H. Merriam 
Frederick R. Miller 

M. Irene Miranda 
L. Doris Moqutn 

John F. Nash 
Katherine O'Connor 
Alice T. O'Malley 

Erwin Pally 
Hope Parker 
Pierre L. Pinet 
Francis P. Powers 
William D. Purcell 

Catherine Quint 
J. Walter Richard 

Mary L. Roach* 



B.A. Radcliffe College; A.M., Ph.D., Bocton University. 
Assistant Professor - History 

B.A. Regis College; M.Ed. Boston College. Instructor - 
Psychology 

B.S. Holy Cross College; M.Ed. Boston College. 
Instructor - English 

A.B. Manhattan College; Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teach- 
ers College. Director - Evening College and Summer 
School 

A.B. Clark University; A.M. Brown University; Ph.D. 
Clark University. Dean 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College; 
C.A.E.S. University of Connecticut. Assistant Professor 
- Industrial Arts 

B.S.Ed. Bridgewater State College; M.A. University of 

Massachusetts. Instructor - English 

B.S.Ed. Salem State Teachers College; M.Ed., Ed.D. 

Boston University. Associate Professor - Elementary 

Education 

A.B., M.S. Boston College; Ed.M. Boston University; 

Ed.D. Syracuse University. Professor - History 

B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.S. Boston 

College. Assistant Professor - Nursing 

B.A. Anna Maria College; M.A., Ph.D. Clark Uni- 
versity. Associate Professor and Chairman - Biology 
Department 

• B.A., A.M. University of Massachusetts; A.M. Harvard 
University. Instructor - English 

B.S.N.E., M.S.N.E. Boston University. Instructor - 
Nursing 

• B.A. University of New Hampshire; M.A. University of 
Pennsylvania. Assistant Professor - French 
A.B. Maryknoll Seminary; M.Ed., Ed.D. Boston College. 
Associate Professor - Secondary Education 

■ B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.C.S. Bos- 
ton University; D.Ed. Harvard University. Professor - 
English 

- B.S. Worcester State College; M.Ed. Boston University. 
Instructor - Elementary Education 

■ B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.S. Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. Associate Professor - Second- 
ary Education 

» B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College. Assist- 
ant Professor - Dean of Women 



David F. Ryder 
Donald J. Schmidt 
Katherine Sehl 

Harry Semerjian 
David Settele 
Robert Shaughnessy 

Louis P. Shepherd 
George Steffanides 
JoAnne Swanson 
Lillian Tater 
Margaret Taylor 
Edmund B. Thomas 

Rene J. Thomas 
Michael Vignale 
<"rank Wolf 

Daniel Yenkevich 
Hobert Zottoli 



B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.A. Uni- 
versity of Maryland. Instructor - Industrial Arts 
B.A., M.A. State College of Iowa; Ph.D. University of 
Iowa. Assistant Professor - Biology 

B.S. DePaul University; M.S. University of Chicago; 

Ed.D. Teachers College Columbia University. Professor 

and Chairman - Nursing Department 

B.M. Boston University College of Music; M.A. Boston 

University. Instructor - Music 

B.S., M.Ed. Boston University. Instructor - Physical 

Education 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.N.S. 
Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Assistant Professor - 
Physics 

B.S.Ed. Kansas State Teachers College of Emporia; A.M. 
Columbia University. Associate Professor - English 
B.S. University of Massachusetts; A.M., Ed.M. Harvard 
University. Assistant Professor - Biology 
B.S.N.E. University of Pittsburgh; M.S. Boston Univer- 
sity. Assistant Professor - Nursing 

B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College; Ed.M. Har- 
vard University. Assistant Professor - English 
B.S.N. New York University; M.S.N. Boston University. 
Instructor - Nursing 

B.S. John Carroll University; M.A. Kent State Univer- 
sity. Assistant Professor - History 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College. Assist- 
ant Professor - Industrial Arts 

A.B., Ph.D. Boston University. Associate Professor - 
Chemistry 

B.S. Kansas State College; M.A., Ed.D. New York Uni- 
versity. Professor - Biology. 

B.A. University of Scranton; M.A. Niagara University. 
Instructor - History 

B.A. Bowdoin College; M.S., Ph.D. University of New 
Hampshire. Assistant Professor - Biology 



Anna Phtlbin 



Signe Antila 



Kathryn A. Baker 



TRAINING SCHOOL — JUNIOR HIGH 

- B.S.Ed. Worcester State Teachers College; Ed.M. 
Fitchburg State Teachers College. Assistant Professor, 
Acting Principal - English 

- B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College. Assis- 
tant Professor - Geography 

- B.S.Ed. Worcester State Teachers College; M.S. Fitch- 
burg State Teachers College. Instructor - English, Latin 



A.B. Bates College; M.Ed. Boston State College. In- 
structor - Mathematics 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College. In- 
structor - Mathematics 

B.S., M.Ed. State College at Fitchburg; C.P.G.SP. 
Boston College. Assistant Professor - Science. 

B.S. Bowling Green State University; M.Ed. Bridge- 
water State College. Instructor - Art 
B.S. Simmons College. Instructor - Home Economics 
A.B. Clark University; L.L.B. Boston University. In- 
structor - History 

B.S.Ed., Ed.M. Fitchburg State Teachers College. Assis- 
tant Professor - English 

SPECIAL SUPERVISORS 

Elizabeth A. Kruczek - B.S. Boston University Sargent College; Certificate. 

Nature Education Natural History Museum. Instructor - 
Physical Education 

B.M. Boston University; M.M. Eastman School of Music. 
Instructor - Music 

B.S., M.Ed. Worcester State Teachers College. In- 
structor - Art 



James W. Balentine 

Richard F. Condon 

Harold Desmond 

Louis Lorenzen 

Frances Marshall 
Margaret S. McLean 

Robert S. Tapply 



Regina Lopes 



Florence Scarpaci 



Marion Cushman 



Helen Carney 

Helen Foot 
Ann Green 

Essie Mae Jackson 

Florence K. Kallan 



Elizabeth Maney 
Robert McDermott 
Irene Passios 
Helene Riley 
Mildred L. Vinskey 



TRAINING SCHOOL — EDGERLY 

- B.S.Ed. Boston University; M.Ed. Harvard University; 
C.G.S. Columbia Teachers College. Assistant Professor, 

Acting Principal - Grade 6 

- B.S.Ed., M.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College. In- 
structor - Grade 2 

- A.B. Simmons College. Instructor - Grade 5 

- A.B. Emmanual College; M.Ed. Fitchburg State College. 
Instructor - Grade 4 

- B.S. Ed. Alcorn A. and M. College; M.Ed. Fitchburg 
State College. Instructor - Grade 5 

- B.S. New York University School of Education; M.S. 
Columbia University School of Social Work. Instructor 
- Grade 3 

- B.S.Ed. Boston University; M.Ed. Fitchburg State Col- 
lege. Instructor - Grade 1 

- B.S.Ed., M.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College. In- 
structor - Grade 4 

- B.S.Ed., M.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers Colege. In- 
structor - Grade 3 

- B.S.P.A. Boston University; M.Ed. Fitchburg State Col- 
lege. Instructor - Grade 1 

- B.S. Worcester State Teachers College; M.Ed. Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts. Instructor - Grade 5 



TRAINING SCHOOL — DILLON 



1. Elizabeth O'Conner - B.S.Ed., M.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College. As- 
sistant Professor, Principal - Grade 1 

- B.S.Ed., M.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College. In- 
structor - Grade 2 



lETTINA ASSELTA 



'ATRICIA BARBARESI 



)ONALD FRANCIOS! 



>ORIS Lystila 



Iargaret McDowell 



B.S.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College; M.A. Univer- 
sity of Connecticut. Instructor - Grade 3 
B.S.Ed., M.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College. In- 
structor - Grade 6 

B.S.Ed., M.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College. In- 
structor - Grade 4 

B.S.Ed., M.Ed. Fitchburg State Teachers College. In- 
structor - Grade 5 



MEDICAL OFFICERS 



'ONAld Paliwonsky, M.D., Medical 

utntino Rollo, M.D., Surgical 
•oris M. Keefe, R.N. 

[argaret M. Peterson, R.N. 



College Physician 

College Physician 
Nurse 

Nurse 



-Lbina Davis 
aul Dupont 



GENERAL PERSONNEL SUPERVISORS 

Supervising Housekeeper 

Chief Engineer 



HTHUR Gagnon 
/ILLIAM KlLMARTIN 

!laire G. Lavoie 

Illen Matson, B.S., M. Ed. 



Head Janitor 

Head Groundsman 

Head Clerk 

Dietitian 



10 State College 

THE STATE COLLEGE AT FITCHBURG 

The State College at Fitchburg was established as a normal school 
under Chapter 457, Acts of 1894 of the General Laws of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. It became a State Teachers College in 1933 
and a State College in 1962. The college now offers the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science in Education, Nursing, and 
Medical Technology and the degree of Master of Education. 

Located on the northern side of the city, the College has an 
attractive campus to which several additional buildings were added 
in the last half dozen years. The newest building is an eleven-story 
dormitory for women. 

In October, 1963 the Library moved into its quarters on the two 
floors of the Adminstration Building. It contains about 50,000 volumes, 
subscribes to nearly 500 periodicals, and has a record collection of 
over 1,000 musical and non-musical records. The Library also includes 
a basic reference collection of the best children's books of all times, 
and special emphasis is placed on books for students in the fields of 
nursing, guidance, and retarded children. An effort is made to supply 
needed materials in every area by weekly additions to the Library. 

One of the unique features of the campus is the laboratory school 
system for children, grades one through nine. The Fitchburg State 
College junior high school is the only training school of its type in 
Massachusetts. 

The current enrollment of the college is more than 1,800 students. 
The curricula available to students include work in Elementary, 
Junior High and Secondary Education, Industrial Arts, Special 
Education for Teachers of the Mentally Retarded, Nursing and 
Medical Technology; and Bachelor of Arts programs in Biology, 
English, History and Physics. The college expects to offer a Bachelor 
of Arts program in Chemistry in the near future. The Industrial 
Arts program is one of the oldest in the nation and the leader in New 
England. While an increased percentage of students intend to take 
their degree in Arts and Science, at present about 80% of the grad- 
uates of Fitchburg State College enter teaching. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND ACTIVITIES 

Students at Fitchburg are fortunate to be in a progressive com- 
munity and area rich in cultural, social, and religious activities; 
within easy travel of such important cities as Worcester, Boston, and 
New York; and in a vacation land famed for its year-round beauty 

and sports. 

All students belong to the Student Government Association, which 
coordinates all student activities. The next largest campus units are 
the four undergraduate class organizations (Freshman, Sophomore. 
Junior, Senior) which are responsible for a variety of activities. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 



11 



including dances, picnics, shows, and the like. Other campus groups, 
varying in size and function, aid in enriching student life at the 
college. 
These include: 



ALPHA PHI OMEGA 
BIOLOGY CLUB 
CHEERLEADERS 
COMMUTING BOARD 
DRAMATICS CLUB 
EPSILON PI TAU (Industrial 

Arts honor society) 
FORUM CLUB 
GLEE CLUB 

HOST and HOSTESS CLUB 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS CLUB 
JUDAIC CLUB 
KAMPUS VUE 
LOGOS HONOR SOCIETY 

(male) 
MEN'S ATHLETIC 

ASSOCIATION 



MEN'S DORMITORY BOARD 

MEN'S INTRAMURAL BOARD 

MUSIC IN THE AIR DISC CLUB 

NEWMAN CLUB 

RIFLE CLUB 

SAXIFRAGE 

SCRABBLE CLUB 

SKI CLUB 

SPECIAL EDUCATION CLUB 

S.T.E.A.M. (Student Teachers Edu- 
cation Association of Mass.) 

STUDENT CHRISTIAN 
ASSOCIATION 

WOMEN'S ATHLETIC 
ASSOCIATION 

WOMEN'S DORMITORY BOARD 



Local cultural activities also include the Fitchburg Regional 
Community Concert Association, offering special student member- 
ships, while the Student Government Association, through its Cul- 
tural Events Committee, provides outstanding figures in the arts 
and sciences. Moreover, there is The Ship's Mast, a private coffee 
house for students and faculty which offers whist, bridge, and chess; 
and on weekends folk singers, lectures, and poetry readings. Although 
nonsectarian and lay, it is sponsored and partially financed by the 
Montachusett Council of Churches. 

Athletically, for male students there is interscholastic competi- 
tion in soccer, basketball, track, and tennis with fellow members of 
the New England Teachers College Athletic Conference and other 
colleges, as well as in golf, while the men's intramural athletic 
program includes competition in soccer, touch-football, basketball, 
and softball. The Women's Athletic Association provides major 
interscholastic and intramural sports in field hockey, volleyball, 
basketball, and softball; other sports offered are archery, tennis, 
badminton, and bowling. 

ADMISSIONS PROCEDURE 

A. Application for admission should be obtained from either the 

Admissions Office, Fitchburg State College, or the local Guidance 
Office. 

B. Application should be submitted as early as possible during 



12 State College 

the applicant's senior year of high school. It is desirable to have it 
accompanied by transcript and school recommendation based upon 
school grades through the first marking period of the senior year. 

C. College Board Scores (The SAT and three achievements) must 
be forwarded to Fitchburg (Code 3518). The Scholastic Aptitude Test 
should be taken as a junior when possible. All scores should be sent to 
Fitchburg State College at the earliest possible date. 

D. When the transcript, recommendation, and College Board 
Scores have been reviewed, the applicant will be notified of any 
further requirements. 

Registration Fee — $20.00 payable within two weeks of notification 
of acceptance. This fee will be deducted from tuition of students who 
attend Fitchburg State College. It is not refundable. 

Tuitiony— Residents of Massachusetts — $200 annually, payable 
$100 at the beginning of each semester. Non-residents — $600 annually, 
payable $300 at the beginning of each semester. 

Room is $180 - $300 and board $360, in college dormitories, 
annually; $25 (not refundable) to be paid upon notification of 
acceptance. 

All fees are payable when due without presentation of bills. 
Checks for tuition and dormitory fees should be made out to 'State 
College at Fitchburg." Check for Student Government Fee should 
be made out to "Student Government Association (or S.G.A.) of 
State College of Fitchburg." 

Other Expenses — Textbooks and Supplies — approximately $100 
a year. 

Personal and social expenses cannot be estimated, as they will 
vary with the individual. 

(NOTE CONCERNING STUDENT PARKING: When conditions 
warrant, parking space for student-owned cars may be available 
on campus, but it is not the obligation of the school to furnish such. 
The College administration disapproves of cars on campus which are 
not needed for work or for teacher-training travel.) 

STUDENT ASSISTANCE 

A limited number of scholarships are available to students in 
certain curricula after they have successfully completed one or 
more semesters of college. National Defense Loans are also available. 
Student employment offers another means of financial assistance. 

All applications for financial assistance must be made to the Dean 
of Men or the Dean of Women after the student is enrolled in college. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 13 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

1. Successful completion of all required courses and of the 
total semester hour requirements of the program. 

2. A 2 or better cumulative average for the total program. 

3. A 2 or better average in the major field. 

4. A satisfactory record of attendance at required class activities. 

5. The successful completion of a standard first aid course (except 
for nursing). 

6. The completion of a minimum of 30 semester hours at the 
college. 

7. All Teacher Education majors must take the National Teachers 
Examination before graduation. 

8. Students graduating in June must file an application for grad- 
uation with the Registrar not later than February first of the year 
of graduation. Students graduating in August must file their 
application by June first. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDENT TEACHING 

1. Satisfactory completion of the psychology sequence required in 
the specific curriculum. 

2. Satisfactory completion of the required professional sequence 
cf courses of the specific curriculum. 

3. Achievement of a satisfactory level of speech in terms of 
pronunciation and grammar. 

4. Indication of the necessary level of readiness and maturity for 
teaching as adjudged by faculty of the department. 

5. Adequate preparation in terms of content: 

A. Completion of a minmum of 30 S.H. with a 2 or better 
average in the major field; or 30 S.H. in the subject matter 
field and related fields for secondary majors. 

B. No failures in the major subject area. (Failures should be re- 
moved by retaking the given course or a recognized sub- 
stitute.) Evidence through personal interview by an Educa- 
tion Department staff member that the student has a sense 
of vocation in entering student teaching. (This might be 
supplemented by extra summer or vacation work in appro- 
priate settings to further indicate interest in working with 
children.) Evidence of adequate health, both physically and 
mentally, to enter the teaching training period. (Here 

formal recommendations from the counseling staff and 
physical education staff might supplement any health 
records.) 



14 State College 

C. Completion of at least 15 S.H. with a 2 or better average 
in the area of specialization for Elementary majors. 

D. Completion of 46 S.H. of shcp work with an average of 2 or 
better in the Industrial Arts curriculum. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM CLASS 

A student who wishes to drop a course must obtain the permission 
of the Registrar. Any student who fails to do this will auto- 
matically receive a WF for the course. However, a student who is in 
good standing in a course who finds it necessary to discontinue the 
course before midsemester warnings have been issued will receive a 
W for the course if he makes the proper arrangements. A student who 
is failing a course will receive a WF. 

Normally a student who drops a course after midsemester warn- 
ings will receive a WF. However, a student with a 2 or better average 
who must lighten his load or drop out of college due to extensive 
illness or serious accident will receive a W regardless of time of with- 
drawal. 

OTHER REQUIREMENTS AND REGULATIONS 

Other requirements and regulations of this college will be found 

in the student handbooks. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The State College at Fitchburg is empowered to grant four 
degrees: Bachelor of Science in Education, Bachelor of Science in 
Nursing, Bachelor of Arts, and Bachelor of Science in Medical Tech- 
nology. Available through the Evening College is the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Industrial Science. 

Students preparing to be teachers are candidates for the Bachelor 
of Science in Education. They may major in elementary education, in- 
dustrial arts, special education, or secondary education. Secondary 
education students also have a subject matter major selected from 
one of the following fields: Biology, Chemistry, English, Geography, 
History, Mathematics, or Physics. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree may major in Biology, 
English, History, or Physics. 

Students in all curricula complete a common core of credits in 
general education distributed as follows: English, Speech, Science 
and Mathematics, Social Science, Fine Arts, Introduction to Knowl- 
edge, Behavioral Science, Philosophy. 

The balance of credits is distributed among major, elective, and 
professional courses. 



at Fttchburg, Mass. 15 

EXPLANATION OF COURSE NUMBERS 

01-09 Non-credit courses. 

10-19 First courses in given area of general education series. 

20-29 Second courses in given area of general education series. 

30-69 Elective courses. 

70-89 Professional courses. 

90-99 Independent Study and Honor courses. 



16 State College 

TEACHER TRAINING CURRICULA 

Students preparing to teach follow a curriculum which leads to a 
B.S. in Ed. degree. Four basic areas of concentration are offered: 
Elementary Education, Special Education (mentally retarded), In- 
dustrial Arts and Secondary Education. Students specializing in sec- 
ondary education may select one of the following majors: Biology, 
Chemistry, English, Geography, History, Mathematics, Physics.* 

Students in all these curricula have a semester of student teach- 
ing. This occurs in the last semester of the junior year or first semester 
of the senior year in the Industrial Arts curriculum. In all other 
curricula it occurs in the first or second semester of the senior year. 
Because classes are divided in half for this activity the sequence of 
semesters of the junior and senior year varies to provide optimum 
pre-training preparation. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
ELEMENTARY CURRICULUM 
Freshman Year 
First Semester Second Semester 

English Composition I 

**History of Civilization I 

Biology I 

Mathematics I 

Art of Music I 

Speech 

Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 

"18 

Sophomore Year 

First Semester Second Semester 

S.H. S.H. 

Literature I 
U.S. History I 
Physical Science I 
General Psychology 
Applied Music 
Elective 
Physical Education IH 



S.H. 




S.H 


3 


English Composition n 


3 


3 


History of Civilization n 


3 


3 


Biology n 


3 


3 


Mathematics II 


3 


3 


Survey of Art Forms I 


3 


2 


Introduction to Man and 






His Knowledge n 


1 


1 


Physical Education II 










if 



3 


Literature II 


3 


3 


U.S. History II 


3 


3 


** introduction to Geography 


3 


3 


Art in Elementary Education 


2 


1 


Elective 


3 


3 


Elective 


3 



16 


Physical Education IV 




17 



at'FUchbur'g, Mass. 



17 



Junior Year 



First Semester 

Child Growth and 
Development 

General Methods 

Reading in Elementary- 
Education 

Educational Measurements 

Elective 

Elective 



First Semester 

Student Teaching in 

Elementary Education 



Second Semester 



S.H. 

3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 

18 



Introduction to Philosophy 
Science in Elementary 

Education 
Mathematics in Elementary 

Education 
Music in Elementary 

Education 
Instructional Material in 

Elementary Education 
Physical Education in 

Elementary Education 
Elective 



Senior Year 



Second Semester 



S.H. 



12 



12 



Regional Geography 

Social Institutions 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 



S.H. 
3 



16 



S.H. 

3 

3 

3 

3 

_3_ 

15 



* All elementary majors must complete 15 semester hours beyond the 
required courses to fulfill specialization. The following areas are avail- 
able: Art, Foreign Language, Geography, History, Language Arts, 
Mathematics, Music, Science. 

** Students taking a foreign language specialization should begin 
this in their freshman year. 

**.* Students taking a geography specialization must take geography 
in the first semester. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
MAJOR IN TEACHING SPECIAL EDUCATION 



First Semester 



English Composition I 
History of Civilization I 
Biology I 
Mathematics I 
General Psychology 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 



freshm 


an Year 






Second Semester 




S.H. 




S.H. 


3 
3 
3 


English Composition II 
History of Civilization II 
Biology II 


3 
3 
3 


3 


Art of Music I 


3 


3 


Human Growth and 




1 



Development 
Speech 
Introduction to Man and 


3 
2 


16 


His Knowledge II 
Physical Education II 


1 




18 



18 



State College 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 



Literature I 
Physical Science I 
Mathematical Concepts 
Introduction to Geography 
Applied Music 
Industrial Arts for Special 

Education 
Physical Education III 



S.H 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 

3 


16 



Second Semester 

S.H. 
Literature II 3 

Physical Science II 3 

Nature and Needs of Mentally 

Retarded 3 

Exceptional Children 4 

Home Arts 3 

Physical Education IV 

16 



First Semester 



Junior Year 



S.H. 



Second Semester 



Principles of Guidance 

Elective 

Elective 



S.H. 



Children's Literature 


3 


Art in Elementary 




U.S. History and Constitution 3 


Education 


2 


Survey of Art Forms I 


3 


Methods of Teaching 




Introduction to Speech 




Mentally Retarded 


3 


Disorders 


3 


Curriculum for Mentally 




Music in Special Education 


2 


Retarded 


3 


Elective 


3 


Reading Methods in Special 






17 


Education 


3 






Educational Measurements 


3 






Elective 


3 






Handwriting 




17 




Senior Year 




First Semester 




Second Semester 






S.H. 




S.H. 


Student Teaching 


12 


Social Institutions 


3 




12 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 



3 

3 

3 

15 



SECONDARY EDUCATION 

All students preparing to teach secondary school follow the same 
basic curriculum in terms of general education and professional 
courses. The sequence of these courses varies with the major in order 
that ample opportunity to build a strong subject matter field can be 
provided. Details of requirements in terms of specific electives, pre- 
requisites, and number of electives will be found under the appropri- 
ate subject matter headings. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 



19 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
BIOLOGY MAJOR 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



English Composition I 

History of Civilization 

Botany I 

Chemistry I 

Algebra and Trigonometry 

Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 



S. H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

1 


16 



Second Semester 



English Composition II 
History of Civilization II 
Botany II 
Chemistry II 
Analytic Geometry 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge II 
Physical Education II 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

1 


16 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 

Literature I 
Invertebrate Zoology 
Organic Chemistry I 
Trends in American 

Education 
Elective in Biology 
Physical Education III 



Second Semester 



S. H. S. H. 

3 Literature II 3 

4 Vertebrate Zoology 3 
3 Biological Lab. Techniques 3 

Biochemistry 3 

3 General Psychology 3 

3 Speech 2 

_0 Physical Education IV __0_ 

16" 17 



Junior Year 



First Semester 

Genetics 
Physics I 

Adolescent Psychology 
Art of Music I 
Biology Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Second Semester 

Physics II 
Social Institutions 
Educational Measurements 
General Methods 
Conservation or Biology 

Elective 
Biology Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 

18 



First Semester 



Student Teaching 
Special Methods 



Senior Year 



Second Semester 



S. H. S. H. 

9 U.S. History and Constitution 3 

3 Introduction to Geography 3 

12~ Introduction to Philosophy 3 

Survey of Art Forms I 3 

Biology Elective 2 or 3 

Elective 3_ 

17 or 18 



20 



State College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
CHEMISTRY MAJOR 



First Semester 



English Composition I 
History of Civilization I 
Biology I 

General Chemistry I 
Algebra and Trigonometry 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 



"reshm. 


an Year 






Second Semester 




S.H. 




S.H. 


3 


English Composition II 


3 


3 


History of Civilization II 


3 


3 


Biology II 


3 


3 


General Chemistry II 


3 


3 


Analytic Geometry 
Introduction to Man and 


3 


1 


His Knowledge II 


1 





Speech 


2 


16 


Physical Education II 






18 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 

Literature I 
Organic Chemistry I 
General Physics I 
Calculus I 
Trends in American 

Education 
Physical Education III 



S.H. 
3 
5 
4 
3 

3 


18 



Second Semester 



Literature II 
Analytical Chemistry I 
General Physics II 
Calculus II 
General Psychology 
Physical Education IV 



S.H. 
3 
4 
4 
3 
3 


17 



Junior Year 



First Semester 

U.S. History & Constitution 
Analytical Chemistry II 
Modern Physics 
Social Studies Elective 
Adolescent Psychology 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Second Semester 



Organic Chemistry II 
Survey of Art Forms I 
General Methods 
Introduction to Philosophy 
Educational Measurements 



S.H. 
5 
3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



17 



Senior Year 



First Semester 

Student Teaching in 

Secondary Education 
Science Methods 



S.H. 

9 

3 

12 



Second Semester 



Physical Chemistry 
Art of Music I 
Social Institutions 
Chemistry Elective 
Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 



21 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
ENGLISH MAJOR 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



English Composition I 
History of Civilization I 
Biology I 
Mathematics I or 

Chemistry I or Physics 
Introduction to Geography 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge 
Physical Education I 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 

I 3 
3 

1 




Second Semester 



English Composition II 
History of Civilization II 
Biology II 
Mathematics II or 

Chemistry II or Physics II 
General Psychology 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge II 
Physical Education II 



S.H. 

3 

3 

3 

3 
3 



16 



16 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 

English Literature I 
World Literature I 
Physical Science I 
Trends in American 

Education 
Speech 
Elective 
Physical Education III 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 

3 
2 
3 


17 



Second Semester 



English Literature II 

World Literature II 

Physical Science II 

Introduction to Philosophy 

Elective 

Physical Education IV 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


15 



Junior Year 



First Semester 

U.S History & Constitution 

Adolescent Psychology 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Second Semester 



Survey of Art Forms I 
General Methods 
Educational Measurements 
Elective 
Elective 



15 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Senior Year 



First Semester 

Student Teaching in 

Secondary Education 
English Methods 



S.H. 

9 

3 

12 



Second Semester 



Social Institutions 
Art of Music I 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



22 



State College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
GEOGRAPHY MAJOR 





Freshman Year 




First Semester 




Second Semester 






S. H. 




S.H. 


English Composition I 


3 


English Composition II 


3 


History of Civilization I 


3 


History of Civilization II 


3 


Biology I 


3 


Biology II 


3 


Mathematics I or 




Mathematics II or 




Chemistry I or Physics I 3 


Chemistry II or Physics II 3 


Introduction to Geography 3 


General Psychology 


3 


Introduction to Man and 




Introduction to Man and 




His Knowledge I 


1 


His Knowledge II 


1 


Physical Education I 





Physical Education II 







16 




16 




Sophomore Year 




First Semester 




Second Semester 






S.H. 




S.H 


Literature I 


3 


Literature II 


3 


Physical Science I 


3 


Physical Science II 


3 


Economics 


3 


Earth Science or 




Trends in American 




Geomorphology 


3 


Education 


3 


Introduction to Philosophy 


3 


Speech 


2 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 


Physical Education IV 





Physical Education III 



17 




15 




Junior Year 




First Semester 




Second Semester 






S.H. 




S.H. 


Literature Elective 


3 


U.S. History II 


3 


U.S. History I 


3 


Survey of Art Forms I 


3 


Adolescent Psychology 


3 


General Methods 


3 


Elective 


3 


Educational Measurements 


3 


Elective 


3 


Elective 


3 




15 




15 




Senior Year 




First Semester 




Second Semester 






S.H. 




S.H. 


Student Teaching in 




Social Institutions 


3 


Secondary Education 


9 


Art of Music I 


3 


Geography Methods 


3 


Elective 


3 




12 


Elective 


3 






Elective 


3 



15 



at Fitchfrurg, Mass. 



23 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
HISTORY MAJOR 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



English Composition I 
History of Civilization I 
Biology I 
Mathematics I or 

Chemistry I or Physics I 
Introduction to Geography 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 

1 




Second Semester 



English Composition II 
History of Civilization II 
Biology II 
Mathematics II or 

Chemistry II or Physics II 
General Psychology 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge II 
Physical Education II 



S.H. 

3 

3 

3 

3 
3 



16 



16 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 

literature I 
U.S. History I 
Physical Science I 
Trends in American 

Education 
Speech 
Physical Education III 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 

3 
2 


17 



Second Semester 



Literature II 
U.S. History II 
Physical Science II 
Political Science 
Introduction to Philosophy 
Physical Education IV 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


15 



Junior Year 



First Semester 

Literature Elective 

Adolescent Psychology 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Second Semester 



Survey of Art Forms I 
General Methods 
Educational Measurements 
Elective 
Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Senior Year 



First Semester 

Student Teaching in 

Secondary Education 
Special Methods 



S.H. 

9 

3 

12 



Second Semester 



Social Institutions 
Art of Music I 
Elective 
Elective 
Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



24 



State College 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS MAJOR 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



S.H. 

3 

3 

3 



English Composition I 
History of Civilization I 
*Mathematics I 
Introduction to Woodworking 2 
Introduction to Technical 

Drawing 2 

Introduction to Metals 2 

Introduction to Typography 2 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 




Second Semester 



English Composition II 
History of Civilization II 
* Mathematics II 
D.C. Circuit Fundamentals 
History of Mechanics 
Introduction to Design 
General Shop I 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge II 
Physical Education II 



S.H. 

3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 

1 
_0_ 

18 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 

Literature I 
General Chemistry I 
General Psychology 
Furniture Making 
Engineering Drawing 
Machine Shop Processes 
Physical Education III 



Second Semester 



S.H. 




S.H. 


3 


Literature II 


3 


3 


General Chemistry II 


3 


3 


Foundations of Industrial 




3 


Arts I 


2 


3 


Graphic Arts 


3 


3 


A.C. Circuit Fundamentals 


3 





Internal Combustion Engines 


3 


18 


Physical Education IV 






17 



Junior Year 



First Semester 

General Physics 

Speech 

Adolescent Psychology 

Principles and Practices in 

Industrial Arts 
Structures 
Elective Shop 



S.H. 
3 
2 
3 

3 
3 
3 

17 



Second Semester 



Student Teaching 
Foundations of Industrial 
Arts II 



S.H. 

9 



12 



♦Algebra and Trigonometry and Analytical Geometry may be sub- 
stituted. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 



25 



Senior Year 



First Semester 



Art of Music I 
U.S. History and Constitution 
Social Institutions 
Introduction to Philosophy- 
Elective Shop (Metal- , 
Power- , Electricity- , 
Graphic Arts- , Crafts-) 
Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Second Semester 



Survey of Arts Forms I 

Philosophy of Education 

Economics 

Elective Shop (Wood- , 
Drawing- , Graphic 
Arts- , Electronics- . 
Crafts- Metal-Power) 

Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 



18 



15 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
MATHEMATICS MAJOR 

Freshman Year 



First Semester 

English Composition I 
History of Civilization I 
Biology I 

General Chemistry I 
Algebra and Trigonometry 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 



Second Semester 



S.H 




S.H 


3 


English Composition II 


3 


3 


History of Civilization II 


3 


3 


Biology II 


3 


3 


General Chemistry II 


3 


3 


Analytic Geometry 
Introduction to Man and 


3 


1 


His Knowledge II 


1 





Physical Education II 






16 



16 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 

Literature I 
General Physics I 
Linear Algebra 
Calculus I 
Trends in American 

Education 
Speech 
Fhysical Education III 



S.H 

3 
4 
3 
3 

3 

2 



18 



Second Semester 



Literature II 
General Physics II 
Calculus II 
General Psychology 
Introduction to Philosophy 
Physical Education IV 



S.H 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 


16 



Junior Year 



. First Semester 

S.H 
U.S. History and Constitution 3 
T.-.")dern Physics 3 



Second Semester 



Introduction to Abstract 
Algebra 



S.H 



26 




State 


College 


Calculus III 
Geometry I 

Educational Measurements 
Adolescent Psychology 


3 
3 
3 
3 
18 


Geometry II 
Principles of Geography 
General Methods 
Survey of Art Forms I 


3 

3 
3 
3 

15 




Senior Year 




First Semester 

Student Teaching in 

Secondary Education 
Mathematics Methods 


S.H 

9 

3 

12 


Second Semester 

Probability & Statistics I 
Social Institutions 
Art of Music I 
* Elective 
* s " Elective 


S.H 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 


* Free Elective. 








• * Mathematics Elective. 









BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 
PHYSICS MAJOR 



First Semester 

English Composition I 
History of Civilization I 
Biology I 
General Physics I 
Algebra & Trigonometry 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 



Freshman Year 




Second Semester 




S.H. 


S.H 


3 English Composition II 


3 


3 History of Civilization II 


3 


3 Biology II 


3 


4 General Physics II 


4 


3 Analytic Geometry 


3 


Introduction to Man and 




1 His Knowledge II 


1 


Physical Education II 






17 



17 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 





S.H. 




S.H 


Literature I 


3 


Literature II 


3 


Modern Physics 


3 


PSSC Physics 


3 


General Chemistry I 


3 


General Chemistry II 


3 


Calculus I 


3 


Calculus II 


3 


Trends in American 




General Psychology 


3 


Education 


3 


Physical Education IV 





Speech 


2 




15 


Physical Education III 



17 







at Fitchburg, Mass. 



27 



Junior Year 



First Semester 

U.S. History & Constitution 
Electronic Physics I 
Calculus III 

Introduction to Geography 
Adolescent Psychology 



S.H. 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 

16 



Second Semester 



Survey of Art Forms I 
Electronic Physics II 
General Methods 
Education Measurements 
Introduction to Philosophy 



S.H. 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 



16 



Senior Year 



First Semester 

Student Teaching in 

Secondary Educaton 
Physics Methods 



S.H. 

9 
3 

12 



Second Semester 



Art of Music I 
Social Institutions 
Physics Elective 
Physics Elective 
Elective 



3 or 
3 or 



S.H. 
3 
3 
4 
4 
3 



15 or 17 



NURSING CURRICULUM 

Students enrolled in this program earn a B.S. in Nursing degree 
and are prepared to take the licensing examination of the Board of 
Registration in Nursing. Upon completion of the examination they 
have the title of Registered Nurse. 

In addition to the classes held on the college campus clinical 
laboratory experiences and observations are carried on in selected 
agencies such as hospitals and public health organizations. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 
Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 





S.H. 




S.H 


English Composition I 


3 


English Composition II 


3 


History of Civilization I 


3 


History of Civilization II 


3 


Chemistry I 


3 


Chemistry II 


3 


Anatomy and Physiology 


I 3 


Anatomy and Physiology II 


3 


General Psychology 


3 


Social Institutions 


3 


Introduction to Nursing I 


1 


Introduction to Nursing II 


1 


Introduction to Man and 




Introduction to Man and 




His Knowledge I 


1 


His Knowledge II 


1 


Physical Education I 





Physical Education II 







17 




"17 



28 



State College 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 





S.H. 




S.H. 


Literature I 


3 


Literature II 


3 


Foundations of Nursing I 


4 


Foundations of Nursing II 


4 


Foundations of Professional 




Foundations of Professional 




Relationships I 


1 


Relationships II 


1 


Algebra and Trigonometry 


3 


Human Growth and 




Microbiology 


3 


Development 


3 


Speech 


2 


Nutrition 


3 


Physical Education III 





Elective (Social Studies) 


3 




16 


Physical Education IV 




17 



Junior Year 



First Semester 

S.H. 
* Medical-Surgical Nursing 12 
Introduction to Pharmacology 2 
U.S. History and Constitution 3 

~T1~ 



Second Semester 



S.H. 

Maternal and Child Health 
Nursing 12 

Principles of Management 2 
Introduction to Philosophy 3 



Senior Year 



First Semester 

* Community and Mental 

Health Nursing 
Survey of Art Forms I 
Elective 



Second Semester 



S.H. 

12 
3 
3 

18 



* Advanced Medical Surgical 

Nursing 
*Nursing Seminar 
Art of Music I 
Elective 



17 



S.H. 

9 
2 
3 
3 

17 



*May be taken in either semester. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 



Candidates for this program earn a B.S. degree in Medical 
Technology. 

The senior year will be spent at Burbank Hospital, or another 
accredited School for Medical Technologists, where additional work 
in biology and chemistry will be given. Upon completion of this 
specialized training, the candidate will be qualified to take examina- 
tions leading to M. T. certification by the Board of Registry of the 
American Society of Clinical Pathologists. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 



29 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



English Composition I 
History of Civilization I 
Biology I 

General Chemistry I 
Alegbra and Trigonometry 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

1 



16 



English Composition II 
History of Civilization II 
Biology II 

General Chemistry II 
Analytic Geometry 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge II 
Physical Education II 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Literature I 

Anatomy and Physiology I 

Organic Chemistry I 

General Psychology 

Speech 

Elective 

Physical Education III 



First Semester 



S.H. 

3 

3 

3 

3 

2 

3 


17 



Literature II 

Anatomy and Physiology II 

Analytic Chemistry 

Introduction to Geography 

Elective 

Physical Education IV 



Junior Year 



Second Semester 



S.H. 

U.S. History and Constitution 3 
Microbiology 3 

Physics I 3 

Art of Music I 3 

Biology Elective I 3 



Biochemistry 

Physics II 

Social Institutions 

Introduction to Philosophy 

Survey of Art Forms I 



15 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

1 



16 



S.H. 

3 

3 

4 

3 

3 


16 



S.H. 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 
15 



Senior Year 
32 credits given for 12 months in an approved hospital school of 
Medical Technology. 

LIBERAL ARTS CURRICULUM 

The Liberal Arts Curriculum is designed for the student whose 
primary interest is in the Liberal Arts and Sciences. Beginning with 
the core of general education courses required of all students in the 
college, the candidate for the B.A. specializes in either English, 
History, Biology, or Physics and meets a required level of proficiency 
in a Foreign Language. 



30 



State College 



English and History majors in this curriculum may take a minor 
in another subject such as art or music. Or they may freely choose 
from offerings of other departments without selecting any second area 
of concentration. Biology and Physics majors will need to use their 
electives for enrichment in related fields. 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BIOLOGY 
Freshman Year 



First Semester 



I 



Second Semester 



English Composition 

Botany I 

Chemistry I 

Algebra and Trigonometry 

Modern Foreign Language 

Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 



S.H. 




S.H. 


3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


English Composition II 
Botany II 
Chemistry II 
Analytic Geometry 
Modern Foreign Language 
Introduction to Man and 


3 
3 
3 
3 

3 


1 



His Knowledge II 
Physical Education II 


1 




16 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Literature I 
Invertebrate Zoology 
Organic Chemistry I 
Modern Foreign Language 
Biology Elective 
Physical Education III 



S.H. 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 

16 



Literature II 

Vertebrate Zoology 

Biochemistry 

Modern Foreign Language 

Biology Elective 

Speech 

PLysical Education IV 



Junior Year 



First Semester 

History of Civilization I 

Physics I 

Art of Music I 

Biology Elective 

Elective 



First Semester 

Social Institutions 
General Psychology 
Introduction to Philosophy 
Biology Elective 
Elective 



Second Semester 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



History of Civilization II 
Physics II 
Biology Elective 
Biology Elective 
Elective 



Senior Year 



Second Semester 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



16 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
2 


17 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



S.H. 



U.S. History and Constitution 3 
Introduction to Geography 3 
Survey of Art Forms I 3 

Biology Elective 2 or 3 

Biology Elective 3 

Elective 3_ 

17 or 18 



at Fitcfoburg, Mass. 



31 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 

English Composition I 
History of Civilization I 
* Mathematics I or 

Chem. I or Physics I 
Art of Music I 
Foreign Language 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 



S.H. 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 

1 



16 



Second Semester 

S.H. 

English Composition II 3 

History of Civilization II 3 
* Mathematics II or 

Chem. II or Physics II 3 

Survey of Art Forms I 3 

Foreign Language 3 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge II 1 

Physical Education II 



16 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 



S.H. 

3 

3 

3 



Second Semester 



English Literature I 
World Literature I 
U.S. History I 
* Biology I or Physical 

Science I or Chem. I 3 
Foreign Language or Elective 3 
Physical Education III 



First Semester 

Fine Arts or Music 
General Psychology 
English Elective 
English Elective 
Elective 



First Semester 

Introduction to Philosophy 
English Elective 
English Elective 
English Elective 
Elective 



15 



English Literature II 
World Literature II 
U.S History II 
* Biology II or Physical 
Science II or Chem. 
Foreign Language 
Speech 
Physical Education IV 



II 



Junior Year 



Second Semester 



S..H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



Social Institutions 
Fine Arts or Music 
English Elective 
English Elective 
Elective 



15 
Senior Year 



Second Semester 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



English Elective 

English Elective 

English Elective 

English Elective 
Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 

3 

3 

2 

_0 

17" 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



S.H. 

3 

3 

3 

3 
_3 

15 " 



*A student must complete 12 semester hours of two science sequencer 
or 6 semester hours of mathematics and 6 semester hours of a science. 



32 



State College 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 
Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 





S.H. 




S.H. 


English Composition I 


3 


English Composition II 


3 


History of Civilization I 


3 


History of Civilization II 


3 


♦Mathematics I 


3 


♦Mathematics II 


3 


Principles of Geography 


3 


General Psychology 


3 


Foreign Language 


3 


Foreign Language 


3 


Introduction to Man and 




Introduction to Man and 




His Knowledge I 


1 


His Knowledge II 


1 


Physical Education I 





Physical Education II 







16 




16 




Sophomore Year 




First Semester 




Second Semester 






S.H. 




S.H 


Literature I 


3 


Literature II 


3 


U.S. History I 


3 


U.S. History II 


3 


Biology I or Physical 




Biology II or Physical 




Science I or Chemistry I 


Science II or Chemistry I 


Economics 


3 


Political Science 


3 


Speech 


2 


Foreign Language or Elective 3 


Foreign Language or Elective c 


Physical Education IV 





Physical Education III 




17 




15' 




Junior Year 





First Semester 

S.H. 
Literature I 3 

Introduction to Philosophy 3 
Foreign Language or Elective 3 
Elective 3 

Elective 3 



Second Semester 



S.H. 

3 

3 



Literature II 
Survey of Art Forms I 
Foreign Language or Elective 3 
Elective 3 

Elective 3 



15 



Senior Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Social Institutions 

**Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



Art of Music I 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 

Elective 



15 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

15 



* A student must complete 12 semester hours of two science sequences 
or 6 semester hours of mathematics and 6 semester hours of science. 



at Fttchburg, Mass. 



33 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHYSICS 



Freshman Year 



First Semester 



English Composition I 
General Physics I 
Algebra and Trigonometry 
Modern Foreign Language 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge I 
Physical Education I 
Speech 



S.H. 
3 
4 
3 
3 

1 

2 

16 



Second Semester 



English Composition II 
General Physics II 
Analytical Geometry 
Modern Foreign Language 
Gen. Psychology 
Introduction to Man and 

His Knowledge II 
Physical Education II 



Sophomore Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Literature I 

Chemistry I 

Modern Physics 

Calculus I 

Modern Foreign Language 

Physical Education III 



First Semester 

History of Civilization 
Electronic Physics I 
Calculus III 
Survey of Art Forms I 
Physics Elective 




Literature II 

Chemistry II 

Calculus II 

Modern Foreign Language 

Optics 

Physical Education IV 



Junior Year 



Second Semester 



S.H. 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 

16 



History of Civilization 
Electronic Physics II 
Differential Equations 
Art of Music I 
Physics Elective 



II 



Senior Year 



First Semester 

Social Institutions 

Elective 

Introduction to Philosophy 

Math. Physics I 

Elective 



Second Semester 



S.H. 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



15 



United States History and 

Constitution 
Geography 
Math. Physics II 
Physics Elective 
Elective 



S.H. 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 
1 



17 



S.H. 

3 

3 

3 

3 

4 

_0_ 

16 



S.H. 
3 
4 
3 
3 
3 

16 



S.H. 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
15 



34 State College 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AND DEPARTMENTAL REQUIREMENTS 

Note: Arabic numbers at end of course descriptions represent semester 
hours and clock hours in that order. 

Example 

Art 10 Survey of Art Forms I 3-3 

The 3-3 represents 3 semester hours, 3 clock hours. 

ART 

Art 10 Survey of Art Forms I 3-3 

Significant art forms in Western Civilization from 1800 to the 
present. 

Art 30 Survey of Art Forms II 3-3 

Significant art forms in Western civilization from the earliest 
times to 1800. 

Art 31 Basic Design 3-3 

The pictorial elements: line, color, shape and texture. The 
integration and usage of these basic elements as a preparation for 
the areas of drawing, painting and sculpture. Prerequisite: Art 10. 

Art 32 Basic Drawing 3-3 

A studio course to acquaint the student with various modes of 
drawing, emphasis being primarily upon the exploration of line 
and mass. Prerequisite: Art 31 or permission of the instructor. 

Art 33 Studio Problems in Painting and Drawing 3-6 

An introduction to the fundamental techniques in pictorial 
composition with emphasis upon the handling of painting media. 
Prerequisite: Art 32. 

Art 34 Art of Asia 3-3 

A survey of the major art forms of Asian cultures. Emphasis on 
Chinese art, especially its calligraphy and painting. 

Art 35 American Art 3-3 

Understanding of the growth and character of architecture, 
sculpture, painting and the minor arts from Colonial days to the 
present, with special emphasis upon contemporary art forms. 

Art 36 Renaissance Painting 3-3 

Painting in Europe from 1250 to 1600. Emphasis on development 
of pictorial structure and technical innovations which set the 
standard of easel painting up to the first half of the 20th century. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 35 

Art 40 Advanced Studio Problems in Painting and Drawing 3-6 
A continuation of Art 33 with a deepening emphasis upon in- 
dividual problems. (Students in the Art Teaching Specialty Pro- 
gram are advised to take this course after the training period.) 
Prerequisite: Art 30. 

Art 80 Art in Elementary Education 2-4 

Observation and discussion of the philosophy and practice of 
art education, and a wide variety of creative experiences, for the 
elementary grades. 

Art 81 Seminar in Art Education 2-2 

Limited to students in the Art Teaching Specialty Program. 
Designed to acquaint the student with professional practices in art 
education. Laboratory experiences, observations in the classroom, 
and discussions concerning professional literature. Prerequisite: 
Art 30. 

Art 90 Independent Study in Art 3 hours credit 

For selected students, upon approval of both department head 
and advising instructor. 

ELECTIVES 

The elective courses, beginning with Art 34, are open to all 
students. Those specializing in art are expected to select at least 
one to complete their Art specialty. 

ART MINOR PROGRAM 

Students in the B.A. program will be admitted into this program 
at the discretion of the art faculty and with the approval of their 
major professor. 

Required Courses in Art Minor Program 
for Elementary Education Majors 

Art 30 Survey of Art Forms II 

Art 31 Basic Design 

Prerequisite: Art 10 

Art 32 Basic Drawing 

Prerequisite: Art 10, Art 31 

Art 33 Studio Problems in Painting and Drawing 
Prerequisite: Art 10, Art 31, Art 32 

Art 40 Advanced Problems in Painting and Drawing 
Prerequisite: Art 10, Art 31, Art 32, Art 33 

Art 81 Seminar in Art Education 

Prerequisite: Art 10, Art 31, Art 32, Art 33. 



36 State College 

ELECTIVES 

Students will select one. Prerequisite: Art 10, Art 30. 

Art 34 Art of Asia 
Art 35 American Art 
Art 36 Renaissance Painting 

BIOLOGY 

Bio. 10A and B Biology I and II 3-4 

A general education course designed to provide an understanding 
of living things. Laboratory investigations supplement lectures. 

Bio. 11 A and B Anatomy and Physiology 3-4 

A study of the structure and physiological mechanisms of the 
human organism at the cellular, tissue, and organ level. Laboratory 
investigations supplement lectures. 

Bio. 12 Invertebrate Zoology 4-6 

Deals with the major phyla of invertebrates. Lectures are 
coordinated with laboratory studies, with emphasis on zoological 
principles and relationships. Prerequisite: Bio. 10A and B. 

Bio. 13 Vertebrate Zoology 3-4 

The study of representative vertebrates. Emphasis is placed on 
ecological and economic factors, as well as life-histories. Laboratory 
investigations supplement lectures. Prerequisite: Bio. 10A and B. 

Bio. 30A Botany of Non-Flowering Plants 3-4 

The emphasis in this course is on representative Thallophytes, 
their biology and their importance to man. Local Bryophytes and 
Pteridophytes are also briefly studied. Laboratory work supplements 
lectures. 

Bio. 30B Botany of Flowering Plants 3-4 

Lectures and laboratories include ecology, economic importance, 
morphology, and classification of representative species of flowering 
plants. Local forms are studied. 

Bio. 32 Biological Laboratory Techniques 3-4 

A study of microtechniques, including wholemounts, using both 
water soluble and hydrocarbon soluble media; smear, sectioning, 
stain-counterstain, squash, embryological, microprojecting, phys- 
iological chemistry, and other molecular biological techniques. Pre- 
requisite: Bio. 10 A and B. 



at iitchburg, Mass, 37 

Bio. 33. Conservation of Natural Resources 3-4 

The use and misuse of renewable resources and the maintenance 
of environmental quality and productivity will be considered in terms 
of past and present environmental influences. Prerequisite: Bio. 42. 

Bio. 34. Field Natural History 3-4 

Primarily a field course concerned with the native flora and 
fauna. Interpretive lectures supplement the field work. 

Bio. 35. Genetics 3-4 

A study of the history of evolutionary thought, the mechanics 
of heredity, the action of environment and heredity on the organism, 
and the application of knowledge in the field to new and anticipated 
problems. Laboratory work supplements formal study. Prerequisite: 
Bio. 10B, Chem. 10B. 

Bio. 36. Plant Physiology 3-4 

A study of the function of plant cells, tissues, and other struc- 
tures. Prerequisite: Chem. 30 A. 

Bio. 37. Anatomy and Physiology 4-6 

A one-semester course that deals with the structure and function 
of the human organism. 

Bio. 38 Microbiology 3-4 

Study of the structure and function of microorganisms with 
special emphasis on their relationships to man. 

Bio. 39 Comparative Chordate Anatomy. 3-4 

A comparative study of the structure and body systems of chor- 
date. Laboratory work supplements lecture. Prerequisite: Bio 10 A 

and B. 

Bio. 40 Marine Biology 3-3 

A course designed to acquaint the student with the ecological 
aspects of the marine environment. A survey of the major animal and 
plant groups along with field trips to marine and estuarine areas 
Prerequisite: Bio. 12. 

Bio. 42 Ecology 3-4 

A study of phenomena such as population relationships, produc- 
tivity, energetics, and community structure. Field trips accompan> 
lectures. Prerequisite: Bio. 12, 13, 30 A and B. 

Bio. 43 Parasitology 3- 

The morphology of representative groups of parasitic protozo 
helminths, and arthropods, and their functional relationships to the 
animal and human hosts. Lecture supplemented by laboratory. Prer 
quisite: Bio. 12; upper-class status. 



.38 State College 

Bio. 80 B.S.C.S. Biology 3-4 

The B.S.C.S. (Biological Sciences Curriculum Study) approach to 
the teaching of biology. B.S.C.S. materials are used and evaluated. 
Seminars supplement supervised preparation of a laboratory and 
supervised contact with students in beginning laboratory. Prerequi- 
site: Upper-class status. 

Bio. 90 Independent Research 2-3 

CHEMISTRY 

Chem. 10A Chemistry I 3-4 

Fundamentals of chemistry with special attention to products 
in physiological chemistry. Required in the Nursing curriculum. 

Chem. 10B Chemistry II 3-4 

The chemistry of carbon compounds at the pre-professional level 
with special attention to problems in physiological chemistry. 
Required in the Nursing curriculum. Prerequisite: Chem. 10 A. 

Chem. 11A and B General Chemistry I and II 3-4 

The fudamental laws and theories of chemistry such as atomic 
structure, the periodic table, electrochemistry, descriptive inorganic 
chemistry, the gas laws, solutions, descriptive organic chemistry and 
chemical binding. Chemical calculations are emphasized. 

Chem. 12A and B General Chemistry I and II 3-4 

Fundamentals of organic and inorganic chemistry. Emphasis on 

modern chemical processes and products. Required of Industrial 
Arts students. 

ELECTIVES AND SPECIAL FIELD REQUIREMENTS 

Candidates for Secondary teaching certificates in Chemistry must 
select courses from those listed below to complete 24 semester hours 
of credit in Chemistry. The Chemistry faculty in charge of counseling 
students may prescribe additional courses in the field. 

Students of other curricula also may elect, under guidance, the 
following courses: 

Chem. 30A and B Organic Chemistry I and II 3-4 

The chemistry of carbon compounds from the functional group 
approach. Aliphatic and aromatic families. Prerequisite: Chem. 11 A 
and B or the equivalent. 

Chem. 32 Biochemistry 3-4 

Introduction to the chemistry of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. 
Special topics on the metabolic processes of living things. Required 
of Biology majors in sophomore year. Prerequisite: Chem. 11 A and B 
or the equivalent. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 39 

Chem. 33 A Analytical Chemistry I 4-6 

Emphasis on theory and application of Qualitative and Quanti- 
tative Analysis. The lectures stress chemical equilibrium, solubility 
product, complexometric formation, oxidation-reduction, and stoichio- 
metric calculations. Laboratory experiments include qualitative 
separation and identification of metal ions; quantitative acid-base, 
redox, complexometric titration and selected gravimetric experiments. 
Prerequisite: Chem. 11A and B or the equivalent. 

Chem. 33 B Analytical Chemistry II 3-5 

Essentially a laboratory course in Instrumental Analysis includ- 
ing one hour lecture per week. Laboratory experiments include 
spectrophotometric, conductometric, potentiometric, and chromato- 
graphic analysis. Prerequisite: Chem. 33 A. 

Chem. 34 Physical Chemistry 3-4 

The underlying principles of chemistry from a physical chemistry 

standpoint. Kinetic theory, theories of the structure of matter, theory 

of electrolytic solutions, electrochemistry, thermodynamics, kinetics. 

Chem. 35 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 3-3 

Valency theories, acid-base theories, reactions in non-aqueous 
solvents, complexation and chelation, physical measurements in 
inorganic chemistry. Prerequisite: Chem. 34. 

Chem. 36 C.B.A. and CHEM STUDY Chemistry 3-3 

The rationale underlying both the theoretical and laboratory 
presentation in the two presentations. Prerequisite: Chem. 34. 

Chem. 90 Independent Study in Chemistry 3-6 

Laboratory research under guidance of the chemistry staff. 
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. 

EDUCATION 

Ed. 03 Handwriting Once a month, no credit. 

Standard handwriting course required of students in the Ele- 
mentary curriculum. 

Ed. 70 Trends in American Education 3-3 

An historical study with emphasis on current practices and 
trends at both Elementary and Secondary levels. Western and Amer- 
ican concepts and influences, issues, leaders and movements in 
current educational literature. Required of Secondary Education 
majors. 

Ed. 76 Instructional Media Techniques 3-3 

A basic study of the effective selection, use and evaluation of 
various types of instructional media for all classroom areas. 



40 State College 

Ed. 80 Principles and Practices in Education 3-5 

Required of all Education majors. Definitions of educational 
goals and systematic training in the achieving of these goals 
Observation on appropriate levels supplements classroom activities 
Ed. 81 Reading in the Elementary School 3-3 

Problems and methods of teaching reading in the primary and 
elementary grades. Procedures for each stage of the pupil's develop- 
ment. Many basic reading series are studied. 

Ed. 83 Reading Improvement 3-3 

A practical program based upon research findings and sound 

instructional procedures. Each student is assigned an individual 
child who has a reading problem. 

Ed. 84 Social Studies in the Elementary School 2-2 

Man and his relationships with other men and with his environ- 
ment. Use and interpretation of graphs, charts and cartoons; use of 
globes and maps; teaching for world understanding. 

ELEMENTARY 

Ed. 85 Student Teaching in Elementary Education 12-25 

Each student is required to have a full semester of student 
teaching consisting of two experiences at the elementary education 
level in selected schools. Under the guidance of experienced co- 
operating teachers and college supervisors each student assumes 
responsibility for teaching and managing the educational program 
Provision is made for conferences throughout the semester. 

Ed. 86 Student Teaching in the Secondary School 9-18 

Students are assigned to a laboratory school for a semester of 
student teaching in their specialized field. Under trained supervision, 
responsibility is gradually assumed for planning and executing the 
educational program. 

Ed. 87 Reading in the Secondary School 3-3 

Curriculum development, materials and nature of reading. 
Emphasizes method of appraisal through teacher observation and 
diagnosis. Required of Secondary curriculum English majors. 

Ed. 88 Special Methods in Major Areas 3-3 

These courses emphasize curriculum development, materials 
and any methods that are peculiar to the specific subject matter 
major. In some instances more specific information will be found 
under departmental descriptions such as English 88, Mathematics 88. 
Science 88 etc. 

Ed. 89 Language Arts in the Elementary School 3-3 

The four aspects of a total program in Language Arts: listening, 
speaking, writing and creativity. Stresses building of desirable 
standards of speaking and writing suitable to the child's level of 
development. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 41 

ELECTIVES AND SPECIAL FIELD REQUIRMENTS 

Each student in Elementary curriculum should select an area of 
specialization. The following areas are available: Science, History, 
Art, Music, Geography, Mathematics, French, Language Arts, and 
Library Science. See departmental write-ups for requirements. 

For a Language Arts specialization the following courses are 
required: 

Ed. 89 Language Arts 

Ed. 83 Reading Improvement 

Eng. 48 Children's Literature 

Sp. 80 Introduction to Speech Disorders 

Psych. 82 Psychology of Speech and Communication 



ENGLISH 

Eng. 10A English Composition I 3-3 

Practice, both oral and written, in expressing ideas with preci- 
sion, clarity and economy. Critical reading. 

Eng. 10B English Composition II 3-3 

Essentially a continuation of Eng. 10A but more advanced. Logic, 
vocabulary of criticism, the research essay. Prerequisite: a passing 
grade in English Composition I. 

Eng. 20A American Literature I 3-3 

Representative American writers from Colonial days through the 
Civil War. 

Eng. 20B American Literature II 3-3 

Representative American writers since the Civil War. 

Eng. 21 A English Literature I 3-3 

British writers from the Old English period through the early 
Romantic writers of the late 18th century. 

Eng. 2 IB English Literature II 3-3 

British writers since the Romantic Movement 

Eng. 22A World Literature I 3-3 

European literary masterpieces from the beginning through the 
middle of the 17th century. 

Eng. 22B World Literature II 3-3 

European literary masterpieces from the mid-17th century to the 
present. 

Eng. 30 World Drama 3-3 

Significant and representative plays from the beginning to the 
modern period. 



42 State College 

Eng. 31 Modern Drama 3-3 

The works of such playwrights as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Sartre, 
Williams, Brecht, Ionesco. 

Eng. 32 The Middle Ages 3-3 

Literary forms that made their first appearance after the emer- 
gence of Middle English. Much attention to Chaucer. 

Eng. 33 The Early Shakespeare 3-3 

Tragedies, comedies and English chronicle histories of Shake- 
speare's youth. 

Eng. 34 The Later Shakespeare 3-3 

Mature comedies and tragedies. This course complements The 
Early Shakespeare but either may be taken independently of the 
other. 

Eng. 35 Elizabethan Literature 3-3 

The main characteristics of Renaissance and Elizabethan Litera- 
ture. 

Eng. 36 The Seventeenth Century 3-3 

Non-dramatic English literature from Bacon through Dryden. 

Eng. 37 Milton 3-3 

The English poems including Paradise Lost, and some prose. 

Eng. 38 The Eighteenth Century 3-3 

From the development of Neo-classicism to the early stirrings 
of Romanticism. Dryden to Burns. 

Eng. 39 Literature of the Romantic Period 3-3 

Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats. Minor authors 
such as Lamb and Hazlitt. 

Eng. 40 Literature of the Victorian Period 3-3 

Prose, poetry and drama are studied for a greater understanding 
of the aesthetic, spiritual and social development of this period. 

Eng. 41 The Novel Before World War I 3-3 

Significant novels representing various countries and periods as 
well as stages in the development of this literary form. 

Eng. 42 The Modern Novel 3-3 

Modern novels of different nations are studied both aesthetically 
and as human documents. 

Eng. 43 The Short Story 3-3 

The episode, tale and novella are studied both as art forms and 
as mediums for the portrayal of personal relationships in various 
countries and periods. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 43 

Eng. 44 Modern Poetry 3-3 

Representative modern poetry with the emphasis on American 
and English poets. 

Eng. 45 Major American Writers of the Twentieth Century 3-3 
The present domination of the United States in world affairs 
as reflected in the varied creativity of American writers of fiction, 
drama, poetry, criticism, and the essay since World War I. 

Eng. 46 British and American Humoi 3-3 

Dwelling primarily on comic writing in the fields of nonsense, 
fantasy, allegory and satire, this course aims to explore the well- 
springs of British and American humor as a reflection of national 
character. 

Eng. 47 Twentieth-Century Irish Literature 3-3 

Synge, Yeats, Joyce, O'Flaherty, O'Connor and O'Faolain, with 
some attention to minor figures of the so-called Irish Literary Renais- 
sance and of recent decades. 

Eng. 48 Children's Literature 3-3 

Criteria for evaluation; story -telling; sources; book clubs; book 
fairs; school and classroom libraries; related areas. 

Eng. 49 Books and Related Materials for Young People 3-3 

The outstanding literature, with guides to its selection and use. 

Eng. 50 History of Literary Criticism 3-3 

Critical theory and practice from Aristotle through the 19th 
century. 

Eng. 51 Modern and Contemporary Criticism 3-3 

Varied theories and practice. Complements History of Literary 
Criticism but either may be taken independently of the other. 

Eng. 52 Historical Development of the English Language 3-8 

The nature and development of the English language, its struc- 
ture, etymology, morphology, multilingual vocabulary and relation 
to other languages, is studied for an understanding of the political, 
social and cultural influences upon our native tongue. 

Eng. 53 Advanced Composition 3-3 

Conducted as a writer's workshop. Stresses written assignments 
in non-fictional prose. 

Eng. 54 Creative Writing 3-3 

For those students who, having completed Freshman Com- 
position I and II with distinction, wish practice and guidance in one 
or two creative literary genres to which they feel termperamentally 
inclined. Upon approval of instructor. 



44 State College 

Eng. 88 Special Methods in the Teaching of English (See under 
Education.) 

Eng. 90 Independent Study 3-3 

For English majors excelling in scholarship, upon approval of 
both department head and advising instructor. 

ELECTIVES AND SPECIAL FIELD REQUIREMENTS 

Students following the Liberal Arts Curriculum with a major 
in English are required to take a total of 27 S.H. of elective courses 
to make a total of 45 S.H. of English. 

Students preparing to teach English are required to take a min- 
imum of 24 elective hours to make a total of 42 S.H. of English. 

The sophomore literature requirement for all curricula may be 
fulfilled by taking either the one-year course in American Literature I 
and II, or the one-year course in English Literature I and II, or the 
one-year course in World Literature I and II. Before deciding which 
of the three to take, the student should ascertain whether it meets the 
requirements of his chosen curriculum. English majors are required 
to take both the one-year course in English Literature I and II and 
the one-year course in World Literature; they may elect the one-year 
course in American Literature I and II. No student may take any of 
the sophomore literature courses unless he has successfully passed 
English Composition I. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

A minimum of 6 semester hours of a foreign language is required 
for credit toward a degree for non-Liberal Arts students who wish 
to take foreign languages as electives. All foreign language courses 
must be taken on a two-semester basis or its equivalent to obtain the 
full 6 credit hours. To satisfy the language requirement for the Bach- 
elor of Arts degree, students must complete one level higher than the 
intermediate, either in the civilization or literature areas. A placement 
test, given in the spring prior to the beginning of the semester, must be 
taken by students to determine their level of proficiency in a specific 
language beyond the elementary level. (Students in the Elementary 
curriculum wishing to specialize in French must reach the minimum 
proficiency level of French 22 or 33 and take French 80.) Those wish- 
ing to specialize in Spanish must reach the minimum proficiency level 
of Spanish 22 or 33 and take Spanish 80. 

FRENCH 

Fr. 10 A French for Beginners 3-4 

Aural- oral approach to correct pronunciation, reading ability, and 
fundamentals of grammar and syntax. French gradually becomes the 
working classroom and laboratory language. 



at Fitchbwrg, Mass. 45 

Ff. 10 B ' French for Beginners 3-4 

A continuation of French 10 A. 

Fr. 11 A French I Intermediate 3-4 

Remedial pronunciation, grammar variety, conversation and lab- 
oratory practice; and readings stressing life, customs, and culture of 
France. Prerequisite: Two years of high school French or French 10 A 
and B and / or satisfactory score on Placement Test. 

Fr. 11 B French II Intermediate 3-4 

A continuation of French 11 A. 

Fr. 22 A French Civilization I 3-3 

The development of the French nation as revealed in its history, 
geography and basic institutions through modern literature. Pre- 
requisites: Placement Test or completion of French HA and B 
and / or instructor's permission. (Course conducted in French.) 

Fr. 22 B French Civilization II 3-3 

A continuation of French 22 A. 

Fr 33 A French Literature I 3-3 

A survey of the main currents of French literature from the 
Middle Ages through the 18th century. Prerequisite: Placement Test 
or completion of French 11 A and B and / or instructor's permission. 
(Course conducted in French.) 

Fr. 33 B French Literature II 3-3 

A survey of the main currents of French Literature of the 19th 
and 20th centuries. Prerequisite: Placement Test or completion of 
French 11 A and B and / or instructor's permission. (Course conducted 
in French.) 

Fr. 80 Methods for Teaching French in the Elementary School 3-3 
Designed to develop phonetic accuracy, aural comprehension and 
fluency in practical use of the language; techniques and materials 
for use in elementary school. Prerequisite: Minimum of 12 semester 
hours beyond beginners' level, and permission of instructor. 

Fr. 90 Advanced French Independent Study 3-3 

Independent study within a designated area on an advanced basis. 
Prerequisite: Minimum of 12 semester hours, 2 grade average (in 
French) and permission of instructor. 

LATIN 

Lt. 11 A Latin I Intermediate 3-3 

Intensive review of grammar, syntax, and forms. Selected read- 
ings in Latin prose and verse. Prerequisite: At least two years of high 
school Latin and / or satisfactory score on Placement Test. 



46 State College 

Lt. 11 B Latin II Intermediate 3-3 

A continuation of Latin 11 A. 

SPANISH 

Sp. 10 A Spanish for Beginners 3-4 

Aural-oral approach to correct pronunciation, reading ability, 
and fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Spanish gradually becomes 
the working classroom and laboratory language. 

Sp. 10 B Spanish for Beginners 3-4 

A continuation of Spanish 10 A. 

Sp. 11 A Spanish I Intermediate 3-4 

Remedial pronunciation, grammar variety, conversation and 
laboratory practice; and readings stressing life, customs, and culture 
of Spain and Spanish America. Prerequisite: Two Years of high school 
Spanish (or Spanish 10 A and B) and / or satisfactory score on Place- 
ment Test. 

Sp. 11 B Spanish II Intermediate 3-4 

A continuation of Spanish 11 A. 

Sp. 22 A Spanish Civilization I 3-3 

Conducted in Spanish. Spanish culture as evidenced in Spain and 
Spanish America through modern representative literature. Prereq- 
uisite: Placement Test or completion of Spanish 11 A and B / or 
instructor's permission. 

Sp. 22 B Spanish Civilization II 3-3 

A continuation of Spanish 22 A. 

Sp. 33 A Spanish Literature I 3-3 

Conducted in Spanish. A survey of Spanish and Spanish American 
Literature. Prerequisite: Placement Test or completion of Spanish 
11 A and B and /or instructor's permission. 

Sp. 33 B Spanish Literature II 3-3 

A continuation of Spanish 33 A. 

Sp. 80 Methods for Teaching Spanish in the Elementary School 3-3 
Designed to develop phonetic accuracy, aural comprehension and 
fluency in the practical use of the language; techniques and materials 
for use in elementary school. Prerequisite: Minimum of 12 semester 
hours beyond beginners' course and permission of the instructor. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Geog. 10 Introduction to Geography 3-.' 

The inter-relationships between the physical and cultural ele- 
ments of man's environmp^ 



at Fitchburg, Mass. Al 

Geog. ?0 Geography of the United States and Canada 3-3 

Organized on the regional basis. Emphasizes the influence of 
topography, climate, soils, vegetation, transportation and natural 
resources on the occupations and cultural development of each 
region. 

Geog. 30 Economic Geography 3-3 

The basic geographic factors that are involved in the production, 

distribution and consumption of the major commodities of the world. 

Geog. 31 Meteorology 3-3 

The laws and principles underlying atmospheric phenomena, 

weather analysis and forecasting, and the application of weather 

data to problems of agriculture, forestry, transportation and health. 

Geog. 32 Climatology 3-3 

A systematic study of the climate regions of the earth and the 

interplay of latitude, pressure ceils, mountain barriers, water bodies, 

ocean currents, and winds on the development of each climate type. 

Geog. 33 Geography of Latin America 3-3 

The geography of the countries and colonies of Latin America; 
historical background and political status, physical and climatic 
regions, agricultural and economic position, and inter-American 
and international relations. 

Geog. 34 Geography of Europe 3-3 

This regional analysis is based on the geographic elements that 
have influenced the evolution of the countries of Europe and have 
produced the national and international problems faced by European 
countries today. 

Geog. 35 Geographic Influences in American History 

Oceans and coasts, islands and harbors, mountain barriers and 
gaps, weather and climate, soil and vegetation, native animals and 
natural resources are analyzed to show their influence on the explo- 
ration, colonization, and expansion of the United States. 

Geog. 36 Political Geography 3-3 

Dependent and independent political units (colonies, protec- 
torates, trust territories, commonwealths, and countries), boundary 
disputes, strategic areas, buffer zones, and international organ- 
izations. 

Geog. 37 Geography of Asia 3-3 

A regional analysis based on the geographic factors that have 
played a part in the development of the internal and external prob- 
lems facing the nations of Asia today. 



48 State College 

Geog. 38 Geography of Africa 3-3 

The economic, political, historical, and cultural development of 
the countries of Africa in relation to their physical environment. 

Geog. 39 Geomorphology 3-3 

Land forms (mountains, plateaus, valleys, lakes, canyons, 
beaches and caves) and their development through the action of 
physical agents: glaciers, surface water, underground water, wind 
vulcanism, diastrophism, and waves. 

Geog. 40 Geography of Oceania 3-3 

Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, the Philippines, and the island 
groups of the Pacific, including Micronesia and Polynesia. 

Geog. 41 Cartography 3-3 

Elementary drafting techniques necessary in presenting data 

on maps, charts and block diagrams. Problems and methods of 

research, compilation, scale and the construction of the common 
types of map projections. 

Geog. 88 Special Methods in Teaching Geography (See under 
Education.) 

Geog. 90 Independent Study in Geography 3-3 

Provides students of exceptional ability and high academic 
achievement who are specializing in Geography the opportunity to 
investigate and analyze, with faculty guidance, a subject or problem 
of geographic significance. 

ELECTIVES AND SPECIAL FIELD REQUIREMENTS 

A major in Geography can be obtained after the Introduction to 
Geography course has been satisfactorily completed by selecting 9 
three-hour courses from the following list of electives. 

Students majoring in Elementary Education with a specialization 
in Geography are required to complete at least 18 semester hours of 
Geography and take Ed. 84 Social Studies in the Elementary School. 
They are encouraged to also take History electives and thereby earn 
a Social Studies specialization. 

HISTORY 

(Also see Social Studies) 
Hist. 10A and 10B History of Civilization I and II 3-3 

Emphasizes the special characteristics and contributions of periods 
and peoples from primitive man until today, with special emphasis 
on the relationship to the present culture. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 49 

Hist. 20 United States History and Constitution 3-3 

The major forces and movements most important in the develop- 
ment of the American heritage from the Revolutionary War to the 
present. Special attention is given to the United States Constitution 
and its role in American history. 
Hist. 21 A United States History I 3-3 

The Colonial scene. The background and causes of the Rev- 
olutionary War, the Articles of Confederation, the United States 
Constitution, the formative years, the Civil War. 
Hist. 2 IB United States History II 3-3 

Begins with the post Civil War Reconstruction, continues through 
the 19th century to the Progressive Era, World War I, the decade of 
reaction, the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, ending 
with the Kennedy years. 

Hist. 30 The American Civil War and Reconstruction Period 3-3 

From 1850 to 1865, especially the nation and its sections in the 
1850's, politics and slavery, Lincoln's rise to power, the political, 
military, diplomatic aspects of the war, reconstruction. 
Hist. 31 The Westward Movement 3-3 

The movement as a social process, and the impact of the West 
on American development. 

Hist. 32 The Economic History of the United States 3-3 

The economic development of the United States from the 
colonial period to the present. Emphasis on the agricultural, financial, 
commercial, industrial-regulatory and labor developments and 
movements. 

Hist. 33 American Diplomatic History 3-3 

A survey of the roots of American diplomacy before 1900, with 
major emphasis on 20th-century problems. 

Hist. 34 American Intellectual History 3-3 

The history of ideas in America from the 17th-century to the 
present. 

Hist. 35 History of Mexico, Central America and the Cribbean 3-3 
History 36 History of Eastern South America (Brazil, Argentina, 
Urugway, Paraguay) 3-3 

Hist. 37 History of Western South America 

(the Andean countries) 3-3 

Each surveys the pre-Columbian and colonial backgrounds, 
the clash and fusion of differing cultures, and the evolution of 
today's unique Latin American civilizations. The arts and the 
writings of social scientists as well . as more conventional historical 
materials are drawn upon to contribute toward an understanding of 
today's problems. 



50 State College 

Hist. 40 Greek and Roman History 3-3 

General summary of Greek and Roman civilizations from the 
arrival of the Hellenes until the end of the Western Empire. The age 
of the Eastern Emperors. 

Hist. 41 The Ancient Near East 3-3 

Intensive study of Egyptian, Mesopotamian, Hebrew, Cretan, 
and Persian civilizations. 

Hist. 42 Byzantine History 3-3 

The development of the concept of a "Second Rome" at the 
Constantinople of Constantine; the religious controversies at the time 
of Julian the Apostate; the East-West Schism; the effects on Slavic 
and Russian converts; the establishments of Moscow as the "Third 
Rome," the Russian Pan-Slavic Messianism to the present. 

Hist. 43 History of the Middle Ages 3-3 

The political-cultural history of the Mediterranean and European 
world from the fall of the Roman Empire to the Renaissance. 

Hist. 44 History of the Renaissance and Reformation 3-3 

The causes and nature of the Renaissance and Reformation and 
their relationship. 

Hist. 45 European History to 1815 3-3 

From 1500 to 1815, with special emphasis upon the political, social, 
and economic progress of the major European nations. 

Hist. 4C European History from 1815 to the Present 3-3 

Liberalism and nationalism, the Industrial Revolution, unification 

of Germany and Italy, World War I, the Russian Revolution, the 

search for security, World War II and the post-war quest for peace. 

Hist. 47 Russian History to 1917 3-3 

The Slavs and the founding of the Kievan State; the Mongol, 
Muscovite and the Empire periods to the 1917 Bolshevik Revolution. 
Social, political and other institutions in pre-Soviet Russia are 
stressed. 

Hist. 48 Russian History - 1917 to the Present 3-3 

The Bolshevik seizure of power in 1917 and the attempts to put 
Marxist theory into practice in Russia. The contributions of Commu- 
mist leaders. The institutional development of education, religion, the 
family, the arts. 

Hist. 49 The Modern Near East 3-3 

A diplomatic history of the Near East from the ascendancy of the 
Ottoman Turks to the establishment of mandatory regimes following 
World War I. 

Hist. 50 British History 55 B.C. - 1603 A.D. 3-3 

The Picts, Celts, Angles, Saxons, Danes and Norman French as 
components of British stock. Pre-Roman, Anglo-Saxon, Norman, 
Angevin and Tudor periods. 



at Fitchbufg, Mass. 51 

Hist. 51 British History - 1603 to the Present 3-3 

Stuarts, Cromwell. Restoration; colonial period; revolutions in 
industry, transportation and agriculture; Napoleonic Era; Victorian 
Age; world empire; World Wars I and II; Britain in the post-war- 
world. The literary and artistic expressions and dominant thought of 
the several eras. 

Hist. 52 History of Imperialism 3-3 

A survey of the relations between Europe and the non-European 
world from the age of discovery through the periods of expansion, 
Western dominance and nationalist uprisings against colonialism. 

Hist. 53 Early Intellectual History 3-3 

The development of historical investigation and the problem of 
historical method as exemplified in ancient and medieval texts and 
writers. Lectures, readings, reports. 

Hist. 54 Modern Intellectual History 3-3 

Critical appraisal of the major contemporary historical traditions. 

Hist. 55 Modern Economic History 3-3 

Economic development in the Western world from the Industrial 
Revolution to the present. 

Hist. 56 Current World Affairs 3-3 

The background, action, and consequences of two World Wars. 
An understanding of present world problems and international rela- 
tions through an analysis of contemporary forces and issues. 
Hist. 88 Special Methods in Teaching of History 3-3 

Special techniques for the teaching of history, and their relation- 
ship to the principles of general methods. 

Hist. 90 Independent Study in History 3-3 

Open to students specializing in History. Each student researches 
and writes a scholarly report under tutorial guidance. 

ELECTIYES AND SPECIAL FIELDS REQUIREMENTS 
Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Arts with a major in 
History or Bachelor of Science in Education with a major in History 
are required to complete a minimum of 30 and 27 semester hours 
respectively in guided elective caurses in or pertaining to their major 
fields. All electives must be approved by the History faculty. Students 
majoring in Elementary Education with a specialization in History 
are required to complete at least 18 semester hours of History and 
take Ed. 84 Social Studies in Elementary School. They are also en- 
couraged to take Geography electives to earn a Social Studies spe- 
cialization. Students in other curricula may also select electives from 
among the following courses. 



52 State College 

... INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

LA. 10 " General Shop I 2-4 

Methods and procedures of conducting teaching units in a 
multiple-activity shop. Students sample at their level, units normally 
carried on in teacher-training assignments. 

LA. 11 Introduction to "Woodworking 2-4 

Emphasizes the individual project method in benchwork and a 
limited amount of machine work. Tools, materials, processes, design. 
The making of household and recreation accessories. 

LA. 12 Introduction to Metals 2-4 

Chemical metallurgy of selected metals, the use of precision 

measuring tools, sheetmetal fabrication, foundry practices, bench 
processes. 

LA. 13 Introduction to Typography 2-4 

The graphic arts industry and methods of visual communication. 
Comparison of the "big three" printing methods, materials and hard- 
ware; screen printing, photography and office reprography. Design, 
type speaks, terminology, point system, papermaking, inks, presses, 
proof marking and movable type. 

LA. 14 D.C. - Circuit Fundamentals 2-4 

Direct current electricity and magnetism plus applications of 
these principles to circuits and devices. Verification of these prin- 
ciples is made by means of experiments, demonstrations, and wiring 
problems. 

LA. 15 History of Mechanics 2-4 

Man's endeaver to harness the materials of nature to meet his 

ever-increasing demand for mechanics and power. Students construct 

a model which is representative of eras of man's accomplishments. 

LA. 16 Introduction to Drawing 2-4 

Lettering, dimensioning, orthographic projection, symbols, sec- 
tioning, isometric and auxiliary views are studied and developed. 
Problem development and blueprint reading. 

LA. 17 Introduction to Design 2-4 

The tools, materials, and processes related to leatherwork, 
ceramics, art metal, jewelry and enameling. Projects are individually 
designed and executed in each area. 

LA. 20 General Shop II 3-6 

Laboratory experiences with common theories and practices of the 
general shop; emphasis on organization including personnel systems, 
individualized activities, preparation of instructional materials, an- 
alysis of criteria for project selection, and application of the unit 
method to student-teaching assignments. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 53 

LA. 21 Furniture Making 3-6 

Furniture woods, design, construction, and finishing. Hand-tool 
skill is furthered, along with machine techniques. Individual pieces 
of small furniture are designed, constructed and finished. 

I.A. 22 Machine Shop Processes 3-6 

Metalworking machine tools and processes, as well as arc 

welding. Design and fabrication of products which involve skill in 
machining and welding. 

I.A. 23 Graphic Arts Unit Teaching S-6 

Problem-centered group activity leading to development of a 
graphic arts unit. Investigation of materials, processes, hardware, 
occupations, historical development, and relationship of unit to 
industry. Emphasis on hand processes, creative hobbies, photography, 
printmaking and collecting, and supporting visual aids. 

I.A. 24 A.C. - Circuit Fundamentals 3-6 

Further application of DC circuit principles covered in D.C. - 
Circuit Fundamentals together with the study of AC circuit fundamen- 
tals, electromagnetism and electromagnetic induction. Experiments 
and tests performed with motors, generators, transformers, controls, 
and various types of drives. 

I.A. 25 Internal Combustion Engines 3-6 

The internal combustion engine and the component parts that 
make up an automobile. Emphasis is on the breaking down, re- 
assembly, testing, and adjusting of a popular-make engine. 

I.A. 26 Engineering Drawing 3-6 

Continuation of fundamentals in the field of intersection and 
developments, revolutions, axonometrics, assembly, and detail draw- 
ing. Chalkboard techniques. 

I.A. 30 Structures 3-6 

Basic principles and assumptions of structural design, including 
drawing and models. An analysis is made of ordinary structural 
members, frames and trusses. Load tests determining reactions, 
shears, bending moments, stresses. 

I.A. 31 Production Furniture 3-6 

Production of high-grade furniture, employing jigs, fixtures, 
and suitable mass-production procedures. Appropriate methods of 
production management are used and studied. 

I.A. 32 Advanced Machine Shop Processes 3-6 

Emphasizes increasing skill in selected areas of metalworking 
and broadening knowledge of machine operation. Oxy-acetylene 
welding of ferrous metals. Practical work of an approved type. 



54 ' State College 

LA. 33 Offset - Lithography 3-6 

Publishing experience solving lithographic problems of design, 
pasteups, camera, stripping, platemaking, and operation of Davidson 
press. Planning dummy, choice of stock, composition, repros, sched- 
uling, binding. Principles of halftones, color theory, photo-sen- 
sitive films and plates; chemistry of inks, papermaking and litho- 
printing. 

LA. 34 Radio Theory and Practice 3-6 

Basic electronic principles and their applications in electronic 
devices. Theory is supplemented by the construction and testing of 
various circuits which illustrate applications of basic principles. 

LA. 35 Project Development in Mechanics 3-6 

For those students whose interests lie in the field of Mechanics. 
Largely devoted to the planning, research and construction of a 
project which has been approved by the instructor. 

LA. 36 Descriptive Geometry 3-6 

In this phase of drawing, problems both abstract and practical 
are worked out graphically. Visualization problems dealing with 
the concept of locus. 

LA. 37 Advanced Design 3-6 

Design as applied to contemporary production methods. Field 
trips to local plants. Students develop individual design projects 
and follow through to a completed design module. Prerequisite: 
Art 17 or equivalent course. 

LA. 40 Research in Industrial Materials 3-4 

Standard tests and procedures and laboratory tests to determine 
the properties of materials under investigation. Reports of research 
studies and laboratory experimentation. 

LA. 41 Woodworking Technology 3-6 

For students who have proved their ability and wish to specialize 
in Woodworking. Tool and machine maintenance, designing and 
making teaching aids, and experimentation in wood technology and 
project development. 

LA. 42 Elements of Metallurgy 3-6 

The physical metallurgy of common metals. Crystallization, 
theories of slip, heat treatments, corrosion, and specimen preparation 
for microscopic inspection. The interpretation and use of the iron- 
carbon equilibrium diagram is required. Prerequisite: LA. 12, 
LA. 22, or equivalent, and consent of instructor. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 55 

LA. 43 Problems of Service Printing 3-6 

Supporting role of the graphic arts: to job shops, in-plant re- 
prography, packaging, advertising, high-school service printing. Il- 
lustrating art, techniques of color separation and printing; audio- 
visual presentation; application of electrostatic printing to computers, 
long-distance facsimile; office copiers. 

LA. 44 Transistors, F.M., Test Equipment 3-6 

Further applications of electronic principles introduced in Elec- 
tronics II as they apply to power supplies, test equipment, photo- 
electric and other devices, plus an introduction to transistor theory 
and practice and FM receivers. 

LA. 47 Ceramics 3-6 

Various methods of clay formation are studied including throw- 
ing on the wheel. Ceramic decorations and designs as related to 
contemporary architecture and sculpture. 

LA. 70 Foundations of Industrial Arts I 2-2 

Educational theories, social and academic setting, and leaders 
of each period of Industrial Arts history from manual training to 
the present, with emphasis on the major contemporary viewpoints 
of industrial arts. 

LA. 71 Foundations of Industrial Arts II 3-4 

An overview of the social and philosophical foundations of 
American public education with emphasis on curriculum theories 
and their application to the structure and organization of Industrial 
Arts in general education. 

LA. 80 Principles and Practices in Industrial Arts 3-3 

Principles underlying methods of planning and guiding learning 
activities with a special emphasis on problem solving, the project 
method and unitary teaching, plus the effective application of these 
methods to Industrial Arts teaching. 

LA. 85 Student Teaching in Industrial Arts 9-18 

Each student is directly responsible for planning, teaching, and 
managing a given number of classes either in the campus junior high 
school or selected public school shops under the supervision of an 
experienced teacher. 

LA. 88 Industrial Arts for Special Education 3-6 

Rudiments of planning, drawing, construction, and use of a 
variety of visual materials. A laboratory approach is made through 
projects to attain background in tools, materials, and processes 
appropriate to this type of teaching. 



56 State College 

LA. 89 Instructional Material in Elementary Education 2-4 

Rudiments of planning, drawing, and construction of a variety 
of visual aids appropriate to the elementary grades. Emphasizes 
selected techniques of fabricating materials common to unit activities 
in the elementary school. 

LA. 90-97 Independent Study in Various Shops 3 hours credit 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Students in the Elementary curriculum wishing to qualify for 
certification as school librarians must take the following courses plus 
English 39 or English 40 for a total of 18 semester hours of work. In 
addition they will serve an internship in the college and training 
school libraries. 

L.S. 81 A and B Reference Materials and Their Use 6-6 

Selection and use of basic reference works such as encyclopedias, 
dictionaries, periodical indexes, biographical dictionaries, atlases, 
yearbooks, directories, handbooks and general bibliographies. 

L.S. 82 A and B Cataloguing and Classification of Materials 6-6 

Accepted procedures for classification and cataloguing of school 
library materials, both book and non-book recordings, films, film- 
strips, slides, maps, pictures and pamphlets. 

MATHEMATICS 

Candidates for Secondary teaching certificates in Mathematics 
must complete a minimum of 33 semester hours of credit in the field, 
the ^q^ivalent of Math. 11, 12 through Math. 38 and 44. 

Students in the Elementary curriculum who wish to specialize in 
Mathematics can do so by electing four courses beyond required Math. 
10 A and B from the courses listed below under the guidance of the 
Mathematics Department. Other interested students may choose elec- 
tives from this area with departmental approval. 

Math. 10 A and B Mathematics I and II 6-6 

The real number s>siem, algebra, trigonometry, analytic 
geometry and calculus. 

Math. 11 Algebra and Trigonometry 3-3 

The real number system, polynomial functions, inequalities, cir- 
cular functions, (polar coordinates and complex numbers), permuta- 
tions, combinations, and probability. 

Math. 12 Analytic Geometry 3-3 

Complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic functions, trig- 
onometric identities, equations and graphs; solution of triangles with 
applications. Prerequisite: Math. 11 or the equivalent. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 57 

Math 13 Introduction to Computer Programming 3-3 

For students with no prior computer experience. Introduction to 
a basic computer language, the technique of constructing flow charts, 
writing programs from problems in mathematics and related areas. 
Problems from engineering, economics, accounting, biology, sociology, 
etc. may be approached by students with such interests. 

Math. 14 Informal Geometry 3-3 

Fundamental ideas of congruence, measurement, parallelism, 
similarity, mathematical models for space, non-metric geometry, 
incidence geometry, convexity, distance and the ruler postulate. 

Math. 31 Calculus I 3-3 

The derivative and its basic properties. Derivatives of the 
elementary functions obtained and applied in geometry and physics. 
The definite integral and the fundamental theorem of calculus. 
Prerequisite: Math. 12 or the equivalent. 

Math. 32 Calculus II 3-3 

The basic properties of integration, techniques of integration, 
application in geometry and physics, Taylor's formula, improper 
integrals, infinite series. Prerequisite: Math. 31 or the equivalent. 

Math. 33 Calculus III 3-3 

The concept of a curve and of a function of several variables. 
Differentiable curves and functions of several variables are defined 
and their properties are applied to geometry and physics. Multiple 
integration. Prerequisite: Math. 32 or the equivalent. 

Math. 34 Geometry I 3-3 

Elementary geometry of space and the plane is studied in a mod- 
ern setting. Emphasis is given to the foundations and the structure 
of the theory. The concepts of incidence, betweenness, measure, con- 
gruence, parallelism, similarity. Prerequisite: Analytic Geometry. 

Math. 35 Theory of Probability and Statistics I 3-3 

Counting methods, probability theory, discrete and continuous 
random variables, sampling methods. Prerequisite: Math. 32 or the 
equivalent. 

Math. 36 Modern College Geometry II 3-3 

A continuation of Math. 34. Axiomatic projective geometry and 
its relationship to other geometries through a study of transformations. 
Prerequisite: Math. 44. 

Math. 37 Elementary Differential Equations 3-3 

Ordinary differential equations and their applications. Particular- 
ly equations of the first order and linear equations of the second order. 
Prerequisite: Math. 33. 



58 State College 

Math. 38 Introduction to Abstract Algebra I 3-3 

Mappings, equivalence relations, congruences, number systems, 
groups, rings, integral domains, fields, polynomials. Prerequisite: 
Math. 11 or College Math. 10 A and B. 

Math. 39 Probability and Statistics II 3-3 

A continuation of Math. 35. One and many dimensional random 
variables, the normal, binomial, Poisson, hypergeometric and beta 
probability density functions with moment generating functions, 
estimation, hypothesis testing, introduction to analysis of variance. 
Prerequisite: Math. 31, 32, and 35 or their equivalent. 

Math. 43 Introduction to Mathematical Logic 3-3 

A course in postulational foundations and the processes of logical 
reasoning. (Not offered every year.) Prerequisite: Math. 11 or Math. 
10 A. 

Math 44 Linear Algebra 3-3 

The theory of finite dimensional vector spaces is developed and 
applied in the study of linear transformations, determinants and ma- 
trices. Prerequisite: Math. 11 and Math. 12. 

Math. 45 Topology 3-3 

Introduction to the study of point-set topology by means of maps 
and networks, set theory, topological spaces and transformations, 
metric spaces, connectedness, compactness, Euler's Theorem, the 
Jordan Curve Theorem, Brouwer's Fixed-Point Theorem. Prerequi- 
site: Math. 33 or permission of the instructor. 

Math. 46 Number Theory 3-3 

An introduction to the study of integers and their properties. 
Divisibility, properties of integers, the greatest common divisor, the 
lowest common multiple, prime numbers, the unique factorization 
theorem, congruences, diophantine problems, Euler's Theorem, Wil- 
son's Theorem, theorems of Fermat. Prerequisite: Math. 12 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Math. 88 A The Secondary School Mathematics Curriculum 3-3 

The objectives and content of a modern mathematics sequence 
for grades 7-12 are studied by examining materials developed by 
S.M.S.G. (School Mathematics Study Group). Representative mate- 
rials developed by other groups will be compared with the SMSG pro- 
gram and the role of axiomatics in mathematics will be developed. 

Math. 88 B Mathematical Concepts 3-3 

Selected topics from the arithmetic, algebra, and geometry of 
modern elementary school mathematics programs, including the 
School Mathematics Study Group Program, the Madison Project, 
and the Stanford Project with attention to the discovery approach. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. __ 59 

MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Courses at affiliated hospitals: 
M.T. 80 Hematology, Serology and Blood Bank 8-19 

Theory and practice of enumeration of blood cells, and evalua- 
tion of stained blood smears; precipitation, agglutination, and com- 
plement fixation tests; determination of human blood groups; 
procurement and preservation of human blood for transfusion. 

M.T. 81 Bacteriology and Parasitology 8-13 

The pathogenic bacteria and fungi, with emphasis on methods 
of identification. 

M.T. 82 Histology and Cytology 4-7 

Individualized instruction in the preparation and staining of 
tissues and body fluids for microscopic study. 

M.T. 83 Biochemistry 8-13 

The chemical composition of body fluids and the significance of 
its variation in disease, with emphasis on instrumentation and the 
development of analytical skills. 

M.T. 84 Laboratory Analyses 4-8 

Supervised practice in the clinical laboratory. 



MUSIC 

Mus. 11 Art of Music I 3-3 

Music as aesthetic experience. Representative styles from the 
Middle Ages to the present; major categories such as symphony, 
oratorio, opera and chamber music. 

Mus. 21 Applied Music 1-2 

Techniques of music for prospective teachers of elementary and 
special classes, largely centered in singing skills. Students who can 
pass an equivalency examination will be exempted. 

Mus. 30 Art of Music II 3-3 

Music's reflection in artistic terms of the values and ideals of 
societies past and present. Inter-relationships between the fine arts. 
May not be substituted for Mus. 11. 

Mus. 31 Symphony 3-3 

Structural and stylistic characteristics of the symphony from the 
18th century to the present time. 

Mus. 32 Opera 3-3 

Several works from the standard operatic repertoire. The student 

becomes familiar with some of the significant trends in modern opera. 



60 State College 

Mus. 33 Chamber Music 3-3 

The vast area of music for smaller combinations of instruments; 
literature for the string quartet. 

Mus. 34 Twentieth-Century Music 3-3 

The idioms and aesthetic notions of the present century, together 
with their relationships to the past. 

Mus. 40 Choral Arts 1-2 

Singing works from the great corpus of choral music past and 
present, including dramatic music. Open to the entire student body 
on audition. No more than 3 semester hours may be applied toward 
graduation. May be taken for audit. 

Mus. 41 Instrumental Arts 1-2 

Small and large ensemble playing of representative works for 
brass, percussion, woodwind and string instruments. Open to the 
entire student body on audition. No more than 3 semester hours of 
Mus. 41 or any combination of Mus. 41 and Mus. 40 applied toward 
graduation. Available for audit. 

Mus. 42 Class Piano 1-2 

Practical keyboard usages in classroom work; accompaniment, 
simple transposition, harmonization of melodies at the keyboard. 

Mus. 43 Class Voice 1-2 

Principles of voice production. Breath control, phrasing, reso- 
nance, diction. 

Mus. 44 Song 3-3 

Popular, folk, and art songs of many nations; application of such 
music to the elementary classroom. 

Mus. 45 Harmony 3-3 

To secure for the student sufficient mastery of four-part har- 
mony to enable him to write harmonizations of simple melodies, as 
well as to grant him a deeper insight into principles of modulation 
and key relationships. 

Mus. 80 Music in Elementary Education 2-4 

The objectives and techniques of music in the first six grades are 
examined. Music in terms of the abilities and needs of the elementary 
school child. Includes observation. Prerequisite: Mus. 11 and 21. 

Mus. 81 Music in Special Education 2-4 

The objectives and techniques of teaching music in special classes. 
Music in terms of the abilities and needs of the mentally retarded 
child. Prerequisite: Mus. 11 and 21. 

Mus. 82 Workshop in Elementary Music Education 2-4 

Modern approaches to professional music education in the 
elementary school. Observation and individual projects. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 61 

Mus. 90 Independent Study in Music 3 hours credit. 

For students of exceptional ability and interest. 

MUSIC TEACHING SPECIALTY - ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

This curriculum is designed to give the elementary classroom 
teacher a special competence in music, with a view particularly to 
making a teacher capable of introducing music into collaborative 
teaching techniques. Students will be admitted at the discretion of the 
music faculty. Conditions for admittance: Keyboard competence of the 
level of the "Two-Part Inventions" and ability to sing on pitch with a 
pleasant tone and accurate rhythm. Required courses: 



Mus. 11 3-3 




Mus. 21 1-2 




Mus. 40 and / or 41 


(at least three semes- 


ters at 1 s.h.) 




Mus. 42 1-2 




Mus. 43 1-2 




Mus. 44 3-3 




Mus. 45 3-3 




Mus. 82 2-4 


- 


Two Music elective!: 


; 6-6 


NURSING 





A final mark of 2 shall be required for each of the nursing 
courses. Nurs. 71 A Foundations of Nursing I is prerequisite to any 
clinical nursing course in the third year of the curriculum. 

A student with an unsatisfactory mark in any of the prerequisite 
courses will be obliged to withdraw from the program until such time 
as the course is offered again, which might be an entire year in the 
case of the course in Foundations of Nursing. 

Nursing 70A Introduction to Nursing 1-1 

An analysis of the historical development of nursing as a con- 
cept and occupation. 

Nursing 70B Introduction to Nursing 1-1 

An analysis of the various approaches to the developing concept 
of nursing. 

Nursing 71 A Foundations of Nursing I 4-7 

To develop and implement the broad concepts of patient care. 
Basic nursing skills, which may be applied to all nursing situations. 
Nursing 71B Foundations of Nursing II 4-7 

A continuation of Foundations of Nursing I, which is a prereq- 
uisite. Planned clinical experience. 



£2 State College 

Nursing 72 Nutrition 3 " 3 

Includes the study of the basic elements of the science of 
nutrition. Food requirements are related to individual need. Budg- 
eting, food purchasing, menu planning, selection, preparation and 
serving of basic foods. 

Nursing 80 Medical-Surgical Nursing 12-24 

To develop nursing concepts from principles and theories of 
the natural and behavioral sciences and from medicine. Basic nursing 
problems are the frame of reference for the organization of knowl- 
edge into content fundamental to the process of nursing the adult. 

Nursing 81 Maternal and Child Health Nursing 12-24 

Role of the family in the community. The importance of, and 
principles to protect and preserve, the health of parent and child. 

Nursing 82 Advanced Medical-Surgical Nursing 9-20 

Critical analysis of nursing problems of the adult and his family. 
Skill in the application of principles of management in meeting the 
nursing needs of a group of patients. 

Nursing 83 Community and Mental Health Nursing 12-24 

Family approach to an understanding of health needs. Agency 
and community organization, epidemiology and environmental health. 
Clinical nursing experience is planned in the combined areas of the 
mental hospital and the community. 

Nursing 87 Pharmacology 2-2 

The origin, preparation, action, therapeutic use and toxic effects 
of commonly used drugs with emphasis on the understanding needed 
by the nurse in the administration of medicines. 

Nursing 88 Principles of Management 2-2 

The basic elements and principles of management are studied, 
with consideration of their application to the practice of nursing and 
to beginning leadership positions in nursing. 

Nursing 89 Nursing Seminar 2-2 

A survey of the current trends and problems confronting nursing 
as a profession. The role of the nurse as both an individual and a 
participant in organizations and groups concerned with these prob- 
lems. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Phil. 10 Introduction to Philosophy 3-3 

The broad problems of truth, reality, goodness and beauty 
through a study of the primary courses of an historical nature, and the 
contributions of major schools of philosophy such as realism, empir- 
icism and idealism. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 63 

Phil. /5U Logic 3-3 

Precise and logical habits of thinking. Both the theoretical and 
practical aspects of logic, beginning with Aristotelian logic and cul- 
minating in an introduction to the principles of symbolic logic. 

Phil. 31 The Philosophy of Plato 3-3 

Plato's theory of ideas, theory of knowledge, ethical and political 
views, doctrine of fine arts. Readings in selected dialogues. 

Phil. 32 The Philosophy of Aristotle 3-3 

A study of Aristotle's philosophy as seen in his "Metaphysics," 
"Politics," and "Nicomachean Ethics." 

Phil. 33 The Philosophy of Communism 3-3 

An historical and critical study of Communism, its origins, phil- 
osophy, and development as found in the writings of Karl Marx and 
as it is applied today. 

Phil. 34 Ethics 3-3 

The representative types of ethical systems and problems from 
Plato to Paul Tillich. 

Phil. 35 Epistemology 3-3 

The problem and method of human knowledge. Various theories 
of knowledge are presented in the light of Idealism, Realism, Prag- 
matism, and Existentialism. 

Phil. 36 Metaphysics 3-3 

Introduction to the origin and development of metaphysical prob- 
lems in Western philosophy. 

Phil. 37 History of Medieval Philosophy 3-3 

A study of the more important philosophers of the Middle Ages 
including St. Augustine, Boethius, Albertus Magnus, Avicenna, Aver- 
roes, Maimonides and St. Thomas along with their influence upon 
subsequent philosophy. 

Phil. 38 History of Modern Philosophy 3-3 

Emphasizes the more important and representative trends of 
modern thought since the Renaissance, including Descartes, Locke, 
Spinoza, Leibniz, Hume, Kant, and Hegel. 

Phil. 39 Contemporary Philosophy 3-3 

An analytical and historical study of contemporary thought from 
Nietzsche to Whitehead. 

Phil. 40 Existentialism 3-3 

The origin of contemporary existentialism; its leading ideas as 
seen in the writings of Kierkegaard, Heidegger, Jaspers, and Sartre. 



6 1 ALute college 



Phil. 41 American Philosophy 3-3 

An historical survey and related readings in American Philosophy 
from the Colonial period through the 20th century. Emphasis will be 
placed on the contemporary scene including Peirce, James, Royce, 
Santayana, and Dewey. 

Phil. 42 Political and Social Philosophy 3-3 

The various political and social ideas beginning with Plato and 
continuing to Marx. 

Phil. 80 Educational Philosophy 3-3 

A guide to the philosophical treatment of educational problems. 
Employs the synoptic, critical and systematic areas of philosophy. 

ELECTIVES AND SPECIAL FIELD REQUIREMENTS 

Students in the Liberal Arts Curriculum who elect a minor in 
Philosophy will select their courses from among those in the 30 and 
40 series. Other students with free electives may also select courses 
from this list. Prerequisite: Phil. 10. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
MEN AND WOMEN 

Instruction in the four required physical education courses in- 
cludes the development of the following in selected sports activities: 

1. Physical Conditioning 

2. Motor Skills 

3. Knowledge, Rules, Techniques and Strategies 

4. Qualities, Leadership, Competitiveness, Cooperation, etc. 

P.E. 01A Physical Education I 0-2 

Instruction is offered in soccer, touch football, field hockey, 
swimming. 

P.E. 01B Physical Education II 0-2 

Instruction is offered in tumbling, basketball, apparatus, track 
and field, dance (folk and square) . 

P.E. 02A Physical Education III 0-2 

Instruction is offered in archery, weight training, tennis, dance 
(modern), badminton. 

P.E. 02B Physical Education IV 0-2 

Instruction is offered in handball, golf, wrestling, apparatus, 
Softball. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION ADAPTIVE COURSE 
The adaptive course of physical education is offered for those 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 65 

students who, because of some functional or structural deficiency, 
are temporarily or permanently unable to take part in the regular 
program. The activities offered will be determined by the needs of 
each individual student according to the advice of the family phy- 
sician. In extreme cases of partial or total disability, consideration 
will be given to a waiver of the physical education requirement. 

P.E. 08 First Aid 0-2 

The official Red Cross Standard course is required for students 
in all curricula except Nursing. 

P.E. 80 Physical Education in the Elementary School 1-2 

Theory and practice course designed to guide the classroom 
teacher in organizing a comprehensive program of physical education 
activities based upon physiological, sociological, and psychological 
needs of elementary children with practice teaching of stunts, tum- 
blings, and rhythmics. 

P.E. 81 Physical Education for Secondary Schools 3-3 

Pertinent background material for organizing and conducting an 
integrated activity program for junior and senior high school boys. 

PHYSICS 

Phys. 10 General Physics 3-4 

A general survey of classical and modern physics. Emphasis on 
fundamental principles and their practical applications. Required of 
all Industrial Arts students. 

Phys. 21 A Introductory Physics I 3-4 

A survey of classical and modern physics. The topics include 
the conservation laws, structure of matter, mechanics, and wave 
motion. Required of Biology majors. 

Phys. 21 B Introductory Physics II 3-4 

A continuation of Physics 21 A, dealing with the topics of electric- 
ity, magnetism, optics, and some atomic and nuclear physics. Prereq- 
uisite: Phys. 21 A. 

Phys. 30 A General Physics I 4-5 

Kinematics, dynamics, Newtonian mechanics of translation 
and rotation, kinetic molecular theory, Kepler's Laws of Motion. 
Required of all Mathematics, Chemistry, and Physics majors. 
Phys. 30 B General Physics II 4-5 

A continuation of Physics 30 A. Electrostatics, electromagnetism, 
circuit theory, wave motion, physical and geometric optics. Calculus 
will be used occasionally. 



66 State College 

Phys. 31 Modern Physics 3-3 

Special theory of relativity, atomic structure, spectra, the quan- 
tum theory, the nucleus and radioactivity. Prerequisite: Physics 30 A 
and 30 B. 

Phys. 32 Electronic Physics I 4-5 

Foundations of electromagnetic theory, including electrostatics 
dielectric theory, electromagnetism, magnetic properties of matter, 
and alternating currents. Prerequisite: Phys. 30 A and 30 B. 

Phys. 33 Electronic Physics II 4-5 

An introductory course in basic electronic phenomena, covering 
topics in elementary circuit theory, electron emission, vacuum tube 
characteristics, vacuum tube circuits, transistors and transistor 
circuits. Prerequisite: Phys. 32. 

Phys. 34 PSSC Physics 3-4 

For prospective Secondary physics teachers. The concepts, demon- 
strations, and experiments contained in the secondary physics course 
prepared by the Physical Science Study Committee. Prerequisite: 
Phys. 30 A and 30 B. 

Phys. 35 A Mathematical Physics I 3-3 

Development of mathematical methods and applications in selec- 
ted physical topics. Classical mechanics, relativity, quantum mechan- 
ics, and statistical mechanics. Prerequisite: Upper-class standing in 
Physics, Chemistry, or Mathematics. 

Phys. 35 B Mathematical Physics II 3-3 

A continuation of topics from Phys. 35 A. 

Phys. 36 Optics 4-5 

An introductory course in geometrical and physical optics includ- 
ing reflection, refraction, lens theory, interference, diffraction, and 
line spectra. Laboratory experiments are an integral part of the 
course. Prerequisite: Phys. 30 A and 30 B. 
Phys. 38 Solid State 3-3 

An introduction to the structure, properties and behavior of 
solids. Both the physics and chemistry of solids. The principles that 
relate the properties and behavior of different materials to their 
structure and environment. A major part of the course is concerned 
with the building of close-packed and lattice models of crystal struc- 
tures. Prerequisite: General Physics, Chemistry, and Algebra. 
Phys. 40 Intermediate Mechanics 3-3 

An analytical treatment of classical mechanics covering the meth- 
ods of statics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, both in a 
plane and in space, and the application of these methods to physical 
problems; oscillations; and Lagrange's Equations. Prerequisite: Math. 
37. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 67 

Phys. 41 Computer Fundamentals 3-3 

Elements of programming, digital computers. Applications of 
computers to problem solving, especially approximate solutions for 
initial value problems and boundary value problems. Applications of 
analog computers may be considered. Prerequisite: Math. 33. 

Phys. 43 Advanced Laboratory 3-5 

A few experiments, using fairly sophisticated apparatus, will be 
performed by the student. The experiments will be from different 
areas of physics. The student will be expected to consult various 
sources including the original source, if available. 

Phys. 88 Physics Methods 3-3 

Special techniques for the teaching of physics are stressed. 

Phys. 90 Independent Study 3-3 

Laboratory research under guidance of physics staff. Prereq- 
uisite: Permission of instructor. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Psych. 10 General Psychology 3-3 

The science of human behavior. Scientific method, maturation, 
motivation, emotions, sensation, perception, learning, personality, 
adjustment. 

Psych. 20 Adolescent Psychology 3-3 

The significance of psychological factors in the adjustment of the 

adolescent to his peers, family, school, society. Prerequisite: Psych. 10. 

Psych. 21 Child Psychology 3-3 

Interaction of the maturational stages with environmental influ- 
ences from conception to puberty. Prerequisite: Psych. 10. 

Psych. 22 Human Growth and Development 3-3 

The life span of man with reference to physiological, social and 
psychological processes. Prerequisite: Psych. 10. 

Psych. 23 Principles of Guidance 3-3 

Introductory course dealing with development of major services 
including an overview of counseling, occupational information, group 
procedures and other specialized aspects of a guidance program. A 
beginning course for all interested in guidance either as a classroom 
teacher or a specialist. 



68 State College 

ELECTIVES 

Psych. 30 Mental Hygiene 3-3 

Factors governing the adjustment of the individual to his environ- 
ment mentally, physically, emotionally, socially. Prerequisite: Psych. 
10. 

Psych. 31 Social Psychology 3-3 

Psychological constructs and concepts applied to the interaction 
between human beings. Prerequisite: Psych. 10. 

Psych. 35 Psychology of Personality 3-3 

Dynamic factors in personality formation are followed through 
approximate sequences of the life periods. Major theories and assess- 
ment. Prerequisite: Psych. 10. 

Psych. 36 Learning and the Culturally Disadvantaged 3-3 

Factors in the gap between cultural background and learning 
experiences of the culturally deprived child. Ways in which the schoo] 
can supplement and counteract the antisocial learning of these 
children. 

Psych. 70 Psychology of Learning 3-3 

Nature and fundamental principles of learning. Effective learn- 
ing procedures and conditions. 

Psych. 80 Educational Measurements 3-3 

Basic statistical concepts and techniques to measure pupil achieve- 
ment, aptitude, personality. Application of teacher-made tests, stand- 
ardized tests and others. Prerequisite: Psych. 10. 

Psych. 81 Psychology of Speech and Communication 3-3 

Fundamental importance of speech and communication as an 
aspect of the whole personality. Origins of speech and language, psy- 
chological factors affecting the development of speech, disturbances 
in the communication behavior of the speaker, voice and personality, 
emotional aspects of hearing and listening, and the psychological 
implications of "silence." 

SCIENCE 

(Also see Biology, Chemistry and Physics) 

Sc. 20A and 20B Physical Science I and II 3-4 

The solar system, motion, energy, electricity, structure of matter, 
atomic structure, chemical combination and atomic energy. 

Sc. 30 Geology 3-4 

Physical and historical geology. Special attention to recent 

glaciation in New England, Laboratory work includes field trips, 
study of rocks, minerals, fossils. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 



69 



Sc. 31 Astronomy 3 " 4 

Motions of the earth, moon and planets including measures of 
time and space. Properties of reflecting and refracting telescopes. 
Some of the properties of stars. A 62mm refractor telescope and a 
6-inch reflector telescope are available. Some evening laboratories. 

Sc. 32 Earth, Sea and Air 3-4 

The earth as a planet, sun-moon-earth relations, earth measure- 
ment; the lithosphere, theories of its formation and change, and 
rock structure; the hydrosphere, properties of water, currents and 
tides; and the atmosphere, winds and weather. Emphasizes the 
scientific theories and concepts behind phenomena. Some selected 
experiments are performed. 

Sc. 81 Science in Elementary Education 3-4 

Science areas particularly applicable in elementary education. 
Physical science and biological problems. Experimentation, obser- 
vation, problem solving. 

Sc. 88 Science Methods for Secondary Teaching 3-3 

Aims, objectives; patterns of curriculum development. Emphasis 
on the demonstrations, experimental projects, field trips and problems 
students encounter in their practice teaching. 

ELECTIVE AND SPECIAL FIELD REQUIREMENTS 

Students majoring in Elementary Education with a specialization 
in Science must complete a minimum of 15 semester hours of Science 
beyond the required Bio. 10A and B and Sc. 20A and B including a 
field science, and earth science. 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 
(Also see History and Geography) 

S.S. 21 Social Institutions 3-3 

Social institutions and culture patterns, in terms of principles of 
sociology, economics, social psychology and cultural anthropology. 
S.S. 22 Introductory Economics 3-3 

The organization and functions of economic society and the in- 
terrelated processes of production, distribution and consumption. 
Current problems are emphasized. 

S.S. 30 Comparative Government 3-3 

Governmental philosophies and their differing political climates. 

The American system receives special emphasis. 

S.S. 31 Introduction to Political Science 3-3 

Survey and analysis of political ideas, institutions, practices 

and parties. Special emphasis upon Great Britain, France, and the 

Soviet Union. Introduces classics and contemporary writings in the 

field. 



70 State College 

S.S. 32 Introductory Anthropology 3-3 

The types, range and diversity in human cultures and cultural 
institutions, past and present. Cultural evolution. The relationship 
of culture and personality. 

S.S. 33 Community Analysis 3-3 

Introduction to the theory and practice of community organ- 
ization. Field study: observation and analysis of social institutions 
in Fitchburg and neighboring communities. 

S.S. 34 Urban Sociology 3-3 

Investigation of the role of the city in history and in modern 
life; the various forms developing in urban societies and the influence 
these forms have on personal and group living. 

Sp. Ed. 90 Independent Study 3-3 

Each student is encouraged to review, develop and synthesize a 
problem in the field of special education. Opportunities for consulting 
and visiting agencies to identify the needs of exceptional children. 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Sp. Ed. 20 Nature and Needs of the Mentally Retarded 3-3 

Characteristics of both educable and trainable children, methods 
of classifications, and causes of mental retardation. Responsibility of 
community and school in providing for the mentally retarded. 

Sp. Ed. 21 Home Arts 3-6 

Foods, clothing and other home arts areas for those who will 
teach and work with the mentally retarded. Food buying, preparation, 
table service; meal planning; basic nutrition; elementary etiquette; 
good grooming; simple sewing; clothing selection and care. 

Sp. Ed. 24 Exceptional Children 4-4 

Etiology, classification, problems of children who have physical 
disabilty, mental retardation, emotional or social difficulties, gifted- 
ness. Clinical observations and consultations. 

Sp. Ed. 71 Curriculum for the Trainable Child 3-3 

Analyzes special problems of curriculum development for the 
trainable child and evaluates curriculum materials and resources. 
Emphasis on content appropriate to the areas of language arts, quan- 
titative thinking, social and civic responsibility. 

Sp. Ed. 72 Problems in Language Arts for Mentally Retarded 3-3 
Students identify, develop, and use resources related to the class- 
room problems in language areas. The stages of development and 
deviations of the exceptional child. Current research, diagnosis, and 
improvement of practical language usage. 



at Fitchburg, Mass. 71 

Sp. Ed. 73 Seminar in Mental Retardation 3-3 

Approaches to educational research and the study of signifi- 
cant problems in mental retardation. Students appraise and apply 
resources in the development of their research problem. 

Sp. Ed. 74 Industrial Skills and Analysis of Job Areas 3-3 

A laboratory course providing technical knowledge and instruc- 
tion of industrial skills appropriate for the mentally retarded. Prac- 
tical experience related to communal needs in job analysis. 

Sp. Ed. 80 Methods of Teaching the Mentally Retarded 3-3 

The organization and planning of activities and materials for 
mentally retarded children at different maturational levels. Study of 
current research related to the application of learning patterns. 

Sp. Ed. 82 Curriculum for the Mentally Retarded 3-3 

Appropriate structures. Emphasizes development of learning, 
language arts, quantitative thinking, social and civic responsibilities, 
pre-vocational experiences. 

Sp. Ed. 83 Reading in Special Education 3-3 

Reading instruction, materials, and diagnostic tests. Children's 
reading difficulties, preventive and remedial techniques, current read- 
ing materials with emphasis on Special-Education curriculum adjust- 
ment. Classroom observation. 

Sp. Ed. 85 Student Teaching 12-25 

Senior students have eighteen weeks of complete classroom re- 
sponsibility, guided by cooperating teacher, college supervisor and 
professional personnel from other disciplines, in teaching varied 
levels of retardation in public schools and institutions. 

SPEECH 

Sp. 01 Speech Improvement 1-0 

Remedial course. Students are assigned to the program after 
diagnosis and recommendations of need for speech improvement. 
Individual and group therapy. 

Sp. 10 Speech 2-3 

Effective organization and delivery of speeches, oral interpreta- 
tion of literature, techniques of intelligent criticism. Forums, panel 
discussions, parliamentary procedure. 

Sp. 80 Introduction to Speech Disorders 3-3 

Designed for the prospective classroom teacher. Introduction to 

diagnostic and therapeutic techniques with the more common types 



72 

of speech disorders: articulation, voice-delayed speech, stuttering, 
and speech disorders associated with mental retardation, hearing 
problems, cerebral palsy, and cleft palate. 



INDEX 



Absem js 


8 


Geology 


59 


Admis ons 


6 


Grading System 


8 


Administration and Faculty 


1 


Graduation Requirements 


7 


Arithmetic 


31 


History 


39 


Arts 


24 


Industrial Arts 


43 


Astronomy 


59 


Intramural Sports 


5 


Athletics 


5 


Library Facilities 


4 


Biology 


26 


Library Science 


47 


Buildings 


4 


Map of Campus 


28-29 


Chemistry 


31 


Mathematics 


47 


College Description 


3 


Medical Technology 


50 


Costs 


6 


Music 


50 


Course Numbering Explanation 


9 


Nursing 


52 


Curriculum Outlines 




Parking, Students 


6 


Teacher Education 


10 


Payment Plan 


6 


Elementary 


10 


Philosophy 


54 


Secondary 


11 


Physical Education 


55 


Biology Majors 


14 


Physics 


56 


History, Geography, and 




Point Average 


7 


English Majors 


12 


Psychology 


57 


Industrial Arts 


15 


Reading 


32 


Mathematics, Chemistry, and 




Recreation 


5 


Physics Majors 


12 


Registration, Initial Fee 


6 


Special Education 


17 


Science 


59 


Nursing Curriculum 


18 


Social Science 


60 


Liberal Arts Curriculum 


19 


Special Education 


60 


Biology Majors 


21 


Speech 


62 


English Majors 


19 


Statistics 


49 


History Majors 


20 


Student Financial Assistance 


7 


Medical Technology Curriculum 


23 


Student Handbook 


9 


Degrees Offered 


9 


Student Course Load 


8 


Education 


32 


Student Organizations 


5 


English 


34 


Student Teaching 


7 


Employment, Student 


7 


Transcripts 


8 


Fees 


6 


Tuition 


6 


French 


36 


Withdrawal 


8 


Geography 


37 


Zoology 


26